Measles & Adults: Buncombe County's Medical Director Offers Vaccine Advice

North Carolina health officials are keeping an eye on the measles as it hovers nearby. The latest count by the Centers for Disease Control shows 880 individual cases of measles have been confirmed in 24 states, including nearby Tennessee and Georgia. The CDC says this is the greatest number of cases reported in the U.S. since 1994 and since measles was declared eliminated in 2000. State and local health officials have been spreading the “get vaccinated” message with a focus on children. But what about adults? BPR’s Helen Chickering checked in with a local health expert.

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The State of Things

More than a thousand people participated in a mass wedding banquet in Taiwan on Saturday to celebrate the island becoming the first place in Asia to legally recognize same-sex unions.

The event included a wedding ceremony for about 20 couples. Couples walked down a red carpet at the wedding banquet, surrounded by jubilant supporters. Supporters gathered around the venue, camping out on picnic blankets to watch the ceremony and stage performances.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Linda Taylor or Linda Bennett (ph) or Linda Gordon (ph) or whoever she really was might have remained a busier than average con artist, maybe the subject of an expose or two in one of the Chicago papers. Instead, she became Exhibit A of a kind of cultural corrosion and governmental ineptitude that Ronald Reagan promised to fix. Here he is in a radio commentary from October, 1976.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Linda Taylor or Linda Bennett (ph) or Linda Gordon (ph) or whoever she really was might have remained a busier than average con artist, maybe the subject of an expose or two in one of the Chicago papers. Instead, she became Exhibit A of a kind of cultural corrosion and governmental ineptitude that Ronald Reagan promised to fix. Here he is in a radio commentary from October, 1976.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Linda Taylor or Linda Bennett (ph) or Linda Gordon (ph) or whoever she really was might have remained a busier than average con artist, maybe the subject of an expose or two in one of the Chicago papers. Instead, she became Exhibit A of a kind of cultural corrosion and governmental ineptitude that Ronald Reagan promised to fix. Here he is in a radio commentary from October, 1976.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

An Israel-based pharmaceutical company has agreed to an $85 million settlement with the state of Oklahoma over its alleged role in fueling the opioid crisis.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter had accused Teva Pharmaceuticals of creating a public nuisance through its production and marketing of opioids. In a statement announcing the settlement, Teva said the agreement "does not establish any wrongdoing on the part of the company." Teva also said it "has not contributed to the abuse of opioids in Oklahoma in any way."

Legendary Green Bay Packers quarterback Bart Starr died Sunday in Birmingham, Ala. He was 85 years old.

Starr, who played for the Packers from 1956 to 1971, was the first quarterback in history to win five NFL championships. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1977.

In a statement on the team website, Green Bay Packers historian Cliff Christl wrote that Starr was "maybe the most popular player in Packers history."

A carbon tax in South Africa will go into effect on June 1. President Cyril Ramaphosa signed the measure into law on Sunday, making South Africa one of about 40 countries worldwide to adopt a carbon-pricing program.

Maybe you know colleagues who keep a sweater or a blanket at their desks to stay warm as the air conditioning tries to ice them out. Alternatively, maybe you have a co-worker who always comments on how warm the space is.

Either way, it's evident that the battle for the thermostat is being waged in offices and homes across the United States.

It's the debate that Tom Chang and his wife have been having for more than a decade.

A possible tornado struck the Oklahoma city of El Reno Saturday night and killed at least two people.

In a news conference early Sunday morning, El Reno mayor Matt White said the storm hit at about 10:30 p.m., and warning sirens sounded at 10:27 p.m.

The storm destroyed an American Budget Value Inn, damaged the nearby Skyview Estates mobile home park and also affected nearby businesses, including a car dealership.

President Trump attended a sumo wrestling competition with Japan's prime minister, Shinzo Abe, on Sunday, as the Japanese rolled out the red carpet for Trump during his visit to Tokyo.

The wrestler who won the competition received a U.S.-made trophy named the President's Cup, in honor of Trump's trip.

"That was something to see these great athletes, because they really are athletes," Trump said after the tournament. "It's a very ancient sport and I've always wanted to see sumo wrestling, so it was really great."

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Arts & Performance

About 50 people have gathered at a gallery inside the Refinery Building in Asheville’s South Slope. It’s a whos-who among people in local dance, theater, music, the visual arts.

They’re here as a nascent arts alliance, putting new effort behind a familiar message—that city and county officials should prioritize the arts in their annual budgets.

Artists in Asheville aren’t unique in this sense—artists everywhere apply and compete for funding from their state and regional arts councils. They’re the custodians of the portion of your tax dollars that fund arts and culture in our communities.

Morin Photography


At a rehearsal in the Woodfin dance studio of the Asheville Ballet, Rebecca O’Quinn is watching two middle-aged women rehearse a duet O’Quinn created around the prop of an overstuffed loveseat.

 

“They kind of take turns running around the couch and flipping over the couch, and are in relationship with each other, and it’s not clear what the relationship is,” she said of this dance work, part of an Asheville Ballet program May 17-18 at Diana Wortham Theatre in Asheville.

 

That unclear relationship could be a metaphor for O’Quinn’s own artistic path.

The Magnetic Theatre

With new works, playwrights often work closely with the director to shape what happens on stage. But once Peter Lundblad finishes writing a play, his involvement with it ends.

“I really like giving it to a director and seeing what they do with it, so I try not to interfere,” he said. “I’m not a details a guy, so somebody else who knows that better. That’s one example of really learning to trust a director.”

Lundblad is perfectly content to leave his new play, “Buncombe Tower,” in the hands of the Magnetic Theatre. And he has left much for the director and cast to interpret. The play is a fantastical, futuristic vision of Asheville and an allegorical commentary on the fallout of gentrification.