Rachel Treisman

Pictogram people become unlikely MVPs

One of the most striking sequences in the Tokyo Olympics' opening ceremony revolved around pictograms. Tokyo organizers have been touting their "kinetic pictograms," which show figures bursting into motion across dozens of disciplines. For Friday's ceremony, they brought all 50 of those pictograms to life.

An investigation is underway after more than 100 night vision goggles disappeared from a maintenance facility at the Fort Hood military base near Killeen, Texas, officials confirmed to NPR.

"Fort Hood is investigating missing Monocular Night Vision Devices from a maintenance facility at Fort Hood, Texas reported on July 12," spokesperson Maj. Marion Nederhoed wrote in an email. "Currently, the missing equipment has no immediate impact on unit readiness."

Updated July 17, 2021 at 11:46 AM ET

One day after a federal district judge in Texas ruled against the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, President Biden said the Department of Justice intends to appeal the decision.

A commercial lobster diver says he escaped relatively unscathed after nearly being swallowed by a humpback whale, in a biblical-sounding encounter that whale experts describe as rare but plausible.

Michael Packard, 56, said in local interviews and on social media that he was diving off the coast of Provincetown, Mass., on Friday morning when the whale suddenly scooped him up.

President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin will not have a joint news conference after they meet in Geneva next week, according to a White House official.

Biden will instead hold a solo press conference after Wednesday's meeting, which will include a working session and a smaller session.

An East Texas bakery is being inundated with orders, supportive messages and donations after revealing it faced backlash over its colorful cookies celebrating Pride Month.

The owners of Lufkin-based Confections unknowingly set off the chain of bittersweet events last Wednesday, when they posted a Facebook photo advertising their heart-shaped, rainbow-iced cookies and calling for "More LOVE" and "Less hate."

The Colonial Pipeline shutdown sent motorists across the Southeast scrambling for gas, even as state and federal officials warn against panic-buying and price gouging.

Mackenzie Walton's first Father's Day without her dad was shaping up to be tough. Then the marketing emails hit.

"I saw some 'Don't forget Dad!' messaging and panicked because I hadn't bought him a present, which led to some ugly crying in the bathroom at work when I abruptly remembered why I hadn't been shopping yet," the Cincinnati-based freelance editor told NPR over email.

The Roman Colosseum is one step closer to having a floor, which will let visitors see the ancient amphitheater from a gladiator's vantage point for the first time in two centuries.

German officials say they have reached an agreement with Nigeria to return a share of plundered artifacts known as Benin Bronzes.

Thousands of plaques and sculptures were looted from the ancient Kingdom of Benin — now southern Nigeria, not the modern nation of Benin — by British soldiers in an 1897 raid, and were ultimately acquired by museums largely in Europe and the United States.

Great news for anyone looking for a change of scenery once it's safe to travel again: The world's longest pedestrian suspension bridge has been completed in Portugal, and it's opening to the public on Monday.

Five people have been arrested in connection with the violent kidnapping of Lady Gaga's dogs earlier this year, the Los Angeles Police Department announced on Thursday.

Germany's highest court has sided with young activists in a landmark climate case, ruling on Thursday that some aspects of the country's climate protection legislation are unconstitutional because they place too much of a burden for reducing greenhouse gas emissions on younger generations.

When a president addresses Congress flanked by the vice president and speaker of the House, it's tradition. But when both of those seats are filled by women, it's history in the making.

Such was the case on Wednesday night, when President Biden delivered his first joint address to a scaled-back crowd of mask-wearing lawmakers.

But the pandemic wasn't the only history-making factor. Behind him sat two women from California: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Harris, both the first women to hold their positions.

One hallmark of a president's joint address to Congress is the guest list: In a typical year, the president and first lady invite guests who they say embody the administration's policy agenda and achievements, while lawmakers often choose plus-ones to make political statements of their own.

With in-person attendance limited because of the coronavirus pandemic, however, most politicians will be tuning in remotely as President Biden delivers his remarks on Wednesday night.

President Biden's address on Wednesday was a night of many firsts for a modern presidential speech to lawmakers, from the barrier-breaking two women behind him to the required face coverings and distanced seating arrangements that have become hallmarks of the coronavirus pandemic.

Digital food magazine Epicurious will no longer publish recipes featuring beef in what it says is an effort to help home cooks become more environmentally friendly.

Young people who get the COVID-19 vaccine in West Virginia won't just gain protection against a deadly virus — they'll also make money.

The state will offer a $100 savings bond to everyone between the ages of 16 and 35 who gets vaccinated, Gov. Jim Justice, a Republican, announced at a Monday briefing. It's part of an ongoing push to get shots into the arms of younger residents, who have been largely slow to roll up their sleeves so far.

The Navajo Nation has vaccinated more than half of its adult population against COVID-19, outpacing the U.S. national rate and marking a significant turnaround for what was once the site of the highest per-capita infection rate in the country.

Last year, the coronavirus pandemic forced many summer camps to close and families to change their plans. Now, new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says camps will be able to open for in-person activities, provided they take specific steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Maryland officials will conduct an independent review of reports of deaths in police custody during the tenure of retired chief medical examiner Dr. David Fowler, representatives from the offices of the governor and attorney general confirmed to NPR on Saturday.

SpaceX's Crew Dragon Endeavor spacecraft successfully docked with the International Space Station early Saturday morning, nearly 24 hours after lifting off from Florida.

A suspect in the U.S. Capitol riot was arrested after allegedly bragging about his involvement in the insurrection to his match on a dating app, who promptly reported him to law enforcement.

Court filings say that exactly one week after the Jan. 6 insurrection, Robert Chapman, 50, told another Bumble user, "I did storm the capitol," adding, "I made it all the way into Statuary Hall." The unnamed individual was evidently not impressed.

"We are not a match," the person wrote, to which he replied, "I suppose not."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "recommends that pregnant people receive the COVID-19 vaccine," CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said Friday, citing a new study on the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines.

Early clinical trials of the two-dose shots did not include pregnant individuals, limiting data and creating a sense of uncertainty for many.

A new law in Oklahoma increases penalties for demonstrators who block public roadways and grants immunity to motorists who unintentionally kill or injure protesters while attempting to flee. Critics of the bill say it is intended to limit demonstrations and puts the people involved in them at risk.

Manhattan's district attorney announced Wednesday that his office will no longer prosecute prostitution and unlicensed massage under a new policy that's believed to be the first of its kind in New York.

The Black teenager who recorded the now-infamous video of Derek Chauvin pressing his knee on George Floyd's neck for nearly 10 minutes last May is being hailed as a hero following the former Minneapolis police officer's conviction on murder and manslaughter charges.

After only about 10 hours of deliberation, a jury has found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd — an outcome Floyd's civil legal team called "painfully earned justice" in a statement released after the verdict was announced.

Months after dropping Parler from its app store, Apple has agreed to reinstate the platform if it makes certain updates to its content moderation practices, according to a letter it sent to two Republican lawmakers. Parler says it will relaunch next week with "several new safeguards" in place.

After three weeks of testimony that included dozens of witnesses and hours of video footage, the high-profile trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd has come to a close. The jury has returned guilty verdicts on all counts.

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