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A white suburban police officer goes on trial in Pittsburgh on Tuesday for fatally shooting an unarmed black teenager last summer.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a new law which will allow the punishment of individuals and online media for spreading what Russia calls "fake news" and information which "disrespects" the state.

High-ranking Democrats on Capitol Hill are calling for a counterintelligence investigation into a woman who has peddled access to President Trump and who founded the massage parlor where New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft is accused of soliciting sex.

Fans and fellow musicians are remembering Dick Dale, who died Saturday at 81. Dale's sound inspired legions of musicians back in the 1960s and into the 21st century.

Preet Bharara was U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York until he was fired by President Trump in 2017. His new book, Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law, hitting shelves Tuesday, explores the justice system through his experiences.

About 100 miles northwest of Dallas-Fort Worth, past pastures of crops and cattle, sits Nocona, Texas, population 3,000, home to the Nokona baseball glove factory, one of the only baseball glove factories left in the United States.

A powerful cyclone tore across southern Africa late last week and the scale of destruction is only now becoming clear. Mozambique's president says as many as a thousand people may have died.

The The Inventor tells the story of the spectacular rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. The startup duped people into investing in a blood testing technology which never completely worked.

Germany wants to speed up its mobile data service with 5G technology, which Chinese telecom Huawei is bidding to provide. But if Berlin lets Huawei compete, it faces the Trump administration's wrath.

Japan Is Betting Big On The Future Of Hydrogen Cars

4 hours ago

It may feel like the electric car has been crowned the future of transportation.
Auto companies have plans to make more electric car models, and sales — still only a tiny fraction of the overall market — are expected to get a boost as more countries pass regulations to reduce carbon emissions. But Japan isn't sure that the battery electric car is the only future, and it's betting big on something it says makes more sense in big cities: hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

A decade ago, the U.S. government claimed that ditching paper medical charts for electronic records would make health care better, safer and cheaper.

Ten years and $36 billion later, the digital revolution has gone awry, an investigation by Kaiser Health News and Fortune magazine has found.

Veteran reporters Fred Schulte of KHN and Erika Fry of Fortune spent months digging into what has happened as a result. (You can read the cover story here.)

Movies On The Radio: Tearjerkers!

7 hours ago

Oh, is there something in your eye? It’s not your fault. Some movies are simply designed to be tearjerkers. 

As head of New York City's correctional health services, Dr. Homer Venters spent nine years overseeing the care of thousands of inmates in the jails on Rikers Island. Though he left Rikers in 2017, what he witnessed on the job has stayed with him.

"What's important to consider about jail settings is that they are incredibly dehumanizing, and they dehumanize the individuals who pass through them," Venters says. "There is not really a true respect for the rights of the detained."

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. There's a new recording of two familiar concert works, piano concertos by Mozart and Beethoven, that are performed in an unfamiliar way that our classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz finds very exciting. Here's his review.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Updated at 5:44 p.m. ET

Darrell Blatchley received a call from the Philippines' Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources early Friday morning reporting that it had a young Cuvier's beaked whale that was weak and vomiting blood.

Within a few hours it was dead.

Blatchley, a marine biologist and environmentalist based in the Philippine city of Davao, gathered his team to drive two hours to where the whale had washed up.

Turkey and Iran launched a joint military operation against Kurdish militants along the the mutual border between the two countries on Monday, according to an announcement from the Turkish interior minister.

Turkey says the two unlikely allies — one a NATO member, the other a target of U.S. sanctions — have joined forces to target a common enemy: the Kurdistan Worker's Party or PKK, which the U.S., Turkey and others consider to be a terrorist group.

In parts of the Midwest, floodwaters are starting to abate. But elsewhere, they're still rising.

In Iowa and Nebraska, hundreds of homes are flooded. There are lakes where fields and roads should be. Local police departments are sending out motorboats instead of squad cars.

MySpace Says It Lost Years Of User-Uploaded Music

9 hours ago

MySpace — the once-dominant social media platform that was largely subsumed by Facebook — may have lost a decade's worth of music uploaded by users, the company says.

MySpace started in 2003 and quickly gained traction as a platform for uploading and sharing music, particularly for new bands trying to find an audience.

Now the company says millions of music files uploaded to the site may have disappeared.

Georgia Beasley was one of the most impressive athletes to come up through the Duke University women’s basketball program. When she graduated in 2001, she was part of the then-winningest senior class in its history, with 111 career victories. Beasley was named ACC Player of the Year in 2000 and 2001, and her performance led her to be drafted into the still-young WNBA. But Beasley always knew her remarkable sports career would not be a lifelong pursuit.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

There aren't many people who can command attention at the White House, the classrooms of Princeton University, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Alan Krueger did all three.

Krueger, who served as economic adviser to former President Barack Obama, died over the weekend at age 58. The cause was suicide, according to a statement from his family, released by Princeton University where Krueger taught.

Update From Netherlands Tram Shooting

11 hours ago

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Earlier today, a gunman opened fire on a tram in the Netherlands in the city of Utrecht. The city's mayor says three people are dead. Several others are injured. At this hour, national authorities have said the gunman remains at large.

The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh whether one of those convicted in the "D.C. Sniper" killings should have a lessened sentence.

Lee Boyd Malvo, 34, is currently serving a life term in prison for his role in the 2002 shootings that killed 10 people. The two months of shootings represent one of the most notable attacks to take place in the nation's capital.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

Dutch police have arrested a man they call the main suspect in a shooting that left three people dead and five others wounded on a tram in the city of Utrecht on Monday. A motive for the shooting remains unclear; police have said they were investigating a "possible terrorist motive" for the attack, but reports have also emerged that the shooting might have its roots in a family dispute.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In February, Pope Francis acknowledged a longstanding dirty secret in the Roman Catholic Church — the sexual abuse of nuns by priests.

It's an issue that had long been kept under wraps, but in the #MeToo era, a #NunsToo movement has emerged, and now sexual abuse is more widely discussed.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

New Zealand's cabinet has agreed "in principle" to tighten gun control laws, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday, promising the changes will make the country safer. "We've unified, there are simply details to work through," she said.

The ballot is set for a new election in North Carolina’s 9th Congressional District. The race includes a crowded field of candidates in the Republican primary, which will be held just over eight weeks from now.

The Bernie Sanders who's running for president in 2020 is not the same Bernie Sanders who ran in 2016.

Yes, he has many of the same policy positions, and many of his 2016 supporters are enthusiastically backing him again. But the Vermont independent senator is no longer the insurgent taking on a political Goliath with huge name recognition. Now, he is the candidate with high name recognition, taking on candidates who are introducing themselves to the American people again.

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