Marshall Terry

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication. Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Raleigh is known for having more tech jobs than Charlotte but that could soon change. Charlotte is on pace to surpass Raleigh-Durham and be dominant in the process. That's according to reporting in the Charlotte Ledger Business Newsletter. Tony Mecia, a former Charlotte Observer reporter, launched the newsletter in March and it's beating the rest of the media in a lot of business stories. So we invited Tony to join Morning Edition for a new segment to talk business news. He spoke to WFAE's Marshall Terry.

Charlotte’s city attorney says CMPD has withheld almost nine minutes of officer body camera footage in the fatal shooting of Danquirs Franklin, 27, at a Burger King on Beatties Ford Road on March 25. City attorney Patrick Baker told the Charlotte Observer Wednesday night that city officials will conduct a review to determine why the full video has not been released and whether more footage can be released to the public. 

In North Carolina, sometimes "no" doesn’t actually mean "no." That’s because of a loophole in state law: A woman cannot legally revoke consent after a sexual act has begun, even if that encounter gets violent. North Carolina is the only state in the country where this is the case.

In what may be a landmark decision, a federal panel of judges has ruled all of North Carolina's congressional districts are illegal partisan gerrymanders.

They've banned the map from being used in this year's election and ordered the General Assembly to draw new districts by 5pm on January 24th.

Lawmakers are expected to appeal the ruling.

Five North Carolina prison workers have died at the hands of inmates this year. In October, inmates killed two prison workers outright and fatally injured two others at the Pasquotank Correctional Institution in Elizabeth City. An officer was killed in April at Bertie Correctional Institution in the eastern part of the state. The Charlotte Observer's Ames Alexander and Gavin Off have reported on how a staffing shortage may have contributed to those deaths and is making the jobs of many prison officers more dangerous.

There were a lot of surprises in a marathon special session by the General Assembly last night.

Closed-door meetings led to significant changes in election law, the budget and more.

Some things lawmakers said they would fix were not. Another thing surfaced which could make you wonder if clam is the new pork.

Morning Edition host Marshall Terry and WFAE reporter Tom Bullock discuss just what happened Thursday night in Raleigh.

Photographer Alvin Jacobs of Charlotte does what you’d expect a photographer to do: Lots of personal portraits and fashion photography are in his portfolio.

And then, he has a passion project. He travels to cities with social unrest. He’s captured protests in places like Ferguson, Baltimore, Charlotte. Last weekend, it was Charlottesville.

It's been almost a week since a bridge construction crew sliced through cables that send power to Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands, forcing an evacuation of tourists.  Officials are now saying it could be this weekend or early next week before the power is back on.

To get some perspective on the economic impact of all this during what is the Outer Banks' peak season, we reached Wit Tuttell. He's the executive director of Visit North Carolina. That's the tourism arm of the state commerce department.  

On Monday, Judge Douglas McCullough of the North Carolina Court of Appeals resigned his seat.  Some 36 days before he turned 72, which is the mandatory retirement age of the court.  The reason, McCullough says was simple. "I retired at that time because I did not want my legacy to the court to be the elimination of my seat and the impairment of the court."

The immediate aftermath of the General Assembly’s failure to repeal House Bill 2 in special session Wednesday was predictable. Democrats blamed Republicans. Republicans blamed Democrats. Opposing activist groups went on the attack. In short, the political spin cycle was on high.

State lawmakers were in Raleigh to deal with House Bill 2 again Wednesday. The purpose in calling the special session was to repeal the legislation, but that didn’t happen.

We're hearing from different voices in that debate. We spoke with Democratic state Senator Jeff Jackson of Mecklenburg County. He said lawmakers had a deal to repeal HB2 and Republicans broke it by attaching a moratorium that bans municipalities from enacting any anti-discrimination ordinances for 180 days.  

In our final chat before Election Day Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks about last minute campaign strategies, early voting results, and this week’s NAACP lawsuit with political analyst Michael Bitzer.

Charlotte City Council did not bite Monday night on state legislative leaders' offer over House Bill 2. State lawmakers said  if council rescinded protections for LGBT people passed early this year, the General Assembly would repeal the bill.  

"It wasn't an offer it was a demand and bullying," says council member Lawana Mayfield. "We teach our children that bullying is wrong, but yet as adults and as political figures to use bullying sends a very mixed message across the state and across the nation."  

She spoke with WFAE's Marshall Terry Tuesday morning.  

This week, we focus on the race for U.S. Senate in North Carolina. Ads in the race began airing this week.  Incumbent Republican Richard Burr is seen as vulnerable in what is a close race. Democrats have made taking back the Senate a priority. WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College discusses the race.

The general election is a little less than 90 days away after, well, some would argue this election season started four years ago. Perhaps our next guest would agree. He’s political science professor Michael Bitzer of Catawba College, and also WFAE’s political analyst. We’ll talk to him every Friday through the general election. He spoke to WFAE's Marshall Terry.

One of the unsolved mysteries of North Carolina is the Brown Mountain Lights. They are unexplained flickers that appear on and around the mountain near Morganton. And those lights have inspired a lot of theories, including aliens being responsible. The lights were even the subject of an X-Files episode.