Leoneda Inge

Leoneda Inge is WUNC's "Race and Southern Culture Reporter." She is the first public radio journalist in the South to hold such a position, which explores modern and historical constructs to tell stories of poverty and wealth, health and food culture, education and racial identity.

Leoneda's most recent work includes the series, "Perils and Promise," an in-depth series focused on the challenges of rural education in Vance County. Leoneda has also featured reports on "Organic Tobacco," "Rebuilding Slave Cabins" and traveled to Tokyo, Japan tracking the importance of North Carolina’s pork industry to that country.

Leoneda is the recipient of three Gracie Awards from the Alliance for Women in Media and several awards from the Associated Press, the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) and the National Association of Black Journalists. In 2006, she and a team of WUNC journalists won an Alfred I. DuPont Award from Columbia University for the series "North Carolina Voices: Understanding Poverty."

Leoneda is a graduate of Florida A&M University and Columbia University, where she earned her Master's Degree in Journalism as a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Business and Economics. In 2014, Leoneda traveled to Berlin, Brussels and Prague as a German/American Journalist Exchange Fellow with the RIAS Berlin Commission/RTDNF.

Elon University joined other schools, community groups and law enforcement officials across the country for an inaugural National Day of Reconciliation. The idea was to improve relations between police and people of color.

Visitation at state parks across the state is bustling in some places and still recovering from Hurricane Florence in others.

A lot of trees fell down, bridges got washed out and there was water erosion at many state parks after the hurricane.

A 40-year old environmental justice situation that involved racial discrimination, broken promises and mistrust has finally been put to rest now that last sewer lines have been laid for the historically black Rogers Road neighborhood.

Preparations for the 2020 Census are underway in North Carolina, one of the fastest growing states in the nation poised to get another congressional seat after the decennial count.

The partial government shutdown is in its third week. While thousands of furloughed federal workers are affected in North Carolina, some from the Environmental Protection Agency are keeping busy as volunteers.

The Orange County Board of Commissioners say they can't do anything about messages on a raised flag waving on a flagpole on private property.

But, they can decide the size of the flag and the height of the flagpole.

The list of universities across the country committing to the study of race and slavery continues to grow. One new school to join the list is Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina.

Last week, the Warren County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to lease the empty building of the former Warren Community Health Clinic to a local physician planning to start a new practice.

It’s early afternoon on a recent Tuesday and Dr. Francis Aniekwensi is preparing to see his twentieth patient of the day.

The former Warren Community Health Clinic in Warrenton sits empty and quiet, across the parking lot from the county health department. Until last year, the clinic served low-income patients who often were unable to pay for medical services and didn’t have Medicare or Medicaid.

In the 1950s and 60s, images of African-American beauty and fashion models in mainstream media were almost non-existent in the United States.

It's been one year since Hurricane Matthew devastated the tiny town of Princeville.  The mighty storm forced millions of gallons of water to swell past a levee along the Tar River, flooding most of the historic African-American community.

Updated 5:13 p.m., August 18, 2017

Several thousand people marched in downtown Durham in a demonstration against racism on Friday afternoon.

Protesters on Thursday marched on the Durham County courthouse in support of the demonstration that brought down a Confederate statue, while a monument to Gen. Robert E. Lee was vandalized nearby at Duke University.

A crowd of people gathered in downtown Durham late Monday to witness the toppling of a long-time Confederate monument. 

It’s a big year for Cheerwine, the cherry-flavored soda with a cult-like following that has been run by the same family for 100 years.

Collectors, historians and everyday people packed the Durham, North Carolina, home of the late John Hope Franklin last weekend.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The tiny town of Princeville, North Carolina is still feeling the effects of Hurricane Matthew, which flooded this historic African-American town in October.

Editor's note:  This story is part of an occasional series on what area community leaders and residents are doing to balance "peace and pride" in their neighborhoods.

The restaurant at the Durham Hotel is known for its eclectic, changing menu. But on a recent day, visiting Chef Tunde Wey turned it up a notch with a first course that included cow foot, tossed in palm oil, a citrus vinaigrette, kumquats, shallots and jollof rice, a popular dish in many West African countries.

The battle for votes is in full swing this last week of early voting across North Carolina. Social justice and voting rights groups have been working especially hard to get African Americans to the polls. They say the demographic group holds the key to who wins on November 8th.

A new report shows Asian Americans are the fastest-growing racial demographic in North Carolina.

It also shows this group of largely independent voters could turn out to be a key swing vote in this upcoming election – if they show up at the polls.

Residents in a small, mostly African-American community in eastern North Carolina are still waiting to see what’s left of their flooded homes since the wrath of Hurricane Matthew.

Editor's note:  This story is part of an occasional series on what area community leaders and residents are doing to balance "peace and pride" in their neighborhoods.

Two years ago today, 17-year-old Lennon Lacy was found hanging from a swing set in a Bladenboro, North Carolina trailer park.

From Atlanta to Chicago, black-owned banks in big cities across the country have reported a rise in new accounts during the past month. One of the oldest black-owned banks in the country is based in Durham, where bank officials report a rise in new accounts and in a new movement to keep the momentum going.

At the Ivanhoe Blueberry Farms in Sampson County, many of the blueberry bushes are close to eight feet tall now, with plants so close, visitors can hardly see from one row to another.

Flanked by a group of children from the North Carolina Prince Hall Mason Youth Assembly in Raleigh, the president of the state's NAACP spoke poignantly Friday morning about the recent deaths of two black men and five police officers thousands of miles away.

Durham Civil Rights activist Ann Atwater – best known for the relationship she forged with her biggest enemy, a member of the Ku Klux Klan – has died. She was 80.

Atwater's fight for justice began at home where she lived in dilapidated housing with no electricity. She tirelessly fought for better housing for blacks in Durham.

When you look closely, what does the face of North Carolina look like?

 Some say North Carolina, one of the fastest-growing states in the nation, is facing an identity crisis. And the controversy surrounding House Bill 2, the new state law that limits transgender access to bathrooms, hasn’t helped the state’s changing identity.

Pages