Jason Fuller

The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts — one half of the married lounge act "Marty & Elayne" died last week, at 89.

For decades, the duo performed five to six nights a week — Marty on drums and vocals, Elayne on piano and flute.

They were fixtures at the Los Angeles bar and restaurant The Dresden Room — with its retro red booths and stiff cocktails — where they played an eclectic mix of jazz standards, original numbers and their own twists on pop hits.

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The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts, one half of the married lounge act Marty & Elayne, died last week at 89.

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If you're looking for a good investment to close out the year, you might not have to look any further than under your Christmas tree, especially if you've got a Lego set there.

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics in Moscow found that select unopened Lego sets on the secondary market saw an average annual return of 11% — that's more than gold and some shares of large companies.

Victoria Dobrynskaya is a researcher who worked on the study. She said it all got started because of her son's hobby.

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As the climate changes, our seasons are changing, too.

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Robert E. Lee lost the Civil War, and now his statue has lost its place on Richmond's Monument Avenue. A pair of filmmakers tells the story of why both those things matter.

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And for my next guest, I needed to know one thing before we got started. So am I talking to a film nerd, buff, scholar? How do you relate to films?

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For more reaction to the day's events, we're going to bring in Democratic Congressman Jason Crow from Colorado. He's also an Army Ranger who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Welcome back to the program.

JASON CROW: Hi, Audie.

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If you've spotted a sick, hurt or deceased bird, please complete the Smithsonian's Sick Wild Bird Report questionnaire here.

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On the day George Floyd was murdered — Monday, May 25, 2020 — there weren't any books exclusively tackling white privilege, anti-Blackness, or policing on the New York Times' Best Sellers list.

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Go to your local sports store and you'll find the shelves groaning under the weight of sneakers named for men's basketball stars: Under Armour Currys, the Kawhi by New Balance and many varieties of Jordans — though it's been a long time since MJ dunked in an NBA game.

What you won't find is a single shoe named for a current WNBA player, though that is about to change. On Wednesday, Breanna Stewart, the power forward for the Seattle Storm, announced a deal with Puma that includes her own signature sneaker.

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Sometimes when you go back to watch an older movie you love, it feels a little bit off - like, ooh, this hasn't aged well. University of Chicago film professor Jacqueline Stewart had that feeling with "Purple Rain," starring the one and only Prince.

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We all know the five senses - sight, sound, smell, taste and touch. But when author Lindsey Parker Rowe went through therapy with her toddler who'd been diagnosed with autism, she learned that there are three more.