Christopher Intagliata

Introducing the amazing spring-loaded larva.
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There's a new move in gymnastics unlike any that's come before.

The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts — one half of the married lounge act "Marty & Elayne" died last week, at 89.

For decades, the duo performed five to six nights a week — Marty on drums and vocals, Elayne on piano and flute.

They were fixtures at the Los Angeles bar and restaurant The Dresden Room — with its retro red booths and stiff cocktails — where they played an eclectic mix of jazz standards, original numbers and their own twists on pop hits.

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The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts, one half of the married lounge act Marty & Elayne, died last week at 89.

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OK. Get ready, world. There's a new move in gymnastics unlike any that's come before.

It began with a knock on the door.

Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker let the man who had knocked into his synagogue, Congregation Beth Israel, in the suburbs of Forth Worth, Texas.

The man was cold so Rabbi Charlie, as he's known, made him a cup of hot tea.

The Saturday morning Shabbat service started.

Rabbi Charlie stood on the bimah, the raised platform at the front of a synagogue. He began a prayer.

"I was facing away from the congregation. When Jews pray, we pray towards Jerusalem," he said.

Then, he heard a click.

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Caroline Tung Richmond was on the phone one night recently talking about how virtual schooling had its challenges, but she thought it was going all right for her 7-year-old daughter.

Her school was open and back to in-person learning, but they had made the decision to keep her home for now to reduce the COVID-19 risk to their 4-year-old son, who isn't yet eligible for a vaccine.

"I said, let's focus on math and reading, just because she had fallen really behind on reading, and I actually thought she had done OK, all things considered," Richmond said.

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Imagine you're moving to a new country on the other side of the world.

Besides the geographical and cultural changes, you will find a key difference will be the language. But will your pets notice the difference?

It was a question that nagged at Laura Cuaya, a brain researcher at the Neuroethology of Communication Lab at at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest.

The U.S. is now averaging more than 400,000 new COVID-19 cases a day. This comes after a week where new case counts shattered the previous day's records again and again. And even those staggering numbers are probably an undercount.

Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told NPR last week that with so many people testing at home, it is hard to capture the true number of cases.

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On January 1, some 400,000 songs, speeches and sound effects entered the public domain. The sounds were all recorded before 1923 and include oddities like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Amid the omicron surge, there is understandable anxiety among parents, particularly those with kids under 5 who can't yet get a COVID-19 vaccine.

They're wondering how to navigate life with young children, what this means for travel plans and day care, and when the vaccine will become available.

Ibukun Kalu is a pediatric infectious disease doctor at Duke University and says her hospital has already seen a rise in children being admitted.

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Soccer games that make you sit on the edge of your seat may be a thing of the past, according to new scientific research.

After analyzing 26 years worth of European soccer matches, in 11 major European soccer leagues, scientists have determined the games have become more predictable over time — and the home field advantage has vanished. The work appears in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

After analyzing 26 years worth of European soccer matches, scientists have determined that the games have become more predictable over time — and the home field advantage has vanished.

Victor Martins Maimone and Taha Yasseri, Football is becoming more predictable; Network analysis of 88 thousands matches in 11 major leagues

We've all had to deal with breakups — with close friends or romantic partners. But breakups aren't a uniquely human phenomenon. Our primate cousins do it too.

Robert Seyfarth, a primatologist at the University of Pennsylvania, says there are a number of ways a breakup can go down in a group of primates.

"We have known for years that primate groups, like baboons and other African monkeys and chimpanzees and gorillas, that they grow in size. And at a certain point, they may split apart," Seyfarth said.

It's the most wonderful time of the year, as they say. That is, unless you ordered the latest gadget too late, and now it's stuck in supply chain limbo.

Or if you are the kind of person who leaves their shopping until it's down to the wire, like Daniel Gritzer, the culinary director of Serious Eats.

Just like humans, groups of baboons sometimes break off relations. Scientists have studied the dynamics of such breakups and say baboons tend to split up in a cooperative, egalitarian way.

Brian A. Lerch et al, Better baboon breakups: collective decision theory of complex social network fissions

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For nearly a decade, scientists have been eavesdropping on killer whales in the Arctic.

(SOUNDBITE OF KILLER WHALES CALLING)

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As the climate changes, our seasons are changing, too.

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Every year, Monarch butterflies from all over the Western U.S. migrate to coastal California to escape harsh winter weather. In the 1980s and '90s, more than a million made the trip. Lately, those numbers have fallen.

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Thanksgiving is almost here and, perhaps, you're planning to brave the deep fryer.

You've got the oil. You've got the pan. You've got the fire. You should be good to go, right?

But, how do you know the oil is ready?

Researchers in the field of fluid dynamics have a trick – use your ears.

The scientists were inspired by a classic kitchen hack, used to test tempura-frying oil. You wet the pointy end of a wooden chopstick, stick it into the oil, and listen.

Scientists have found something strange has been happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon in recent years.

Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were also shrinking in size.

"We found that size is not only shrinking for those sensitive species — it was declining for everyone," said researcher Vitek Jirinec of Louisiana State University.

Jirinec's findings are contained in a new study published in the journal Science Advances last Friday.

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In recent years, scientists found something strange was happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon. Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were shrinking in size.

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