Carrie Kahn

MEXICO CITY — Prosecutors in Nicaragua have ordered the arrest of award-winning author and former vice president Sergio Ramirez, charging him with inciting hatred and conspiring to destabilize the Central American country. The charges against Ramirez are just the latest in the crackdown on critics of Nicaragua's longtime president, Daniel Ortega.

MEXICO CITY — Mexicans are sharing spectacular videos of bursts of blue lights seen streaking across the skies as a strong earthquake rocked the country's Pacific coast city of Acapulco on Wednesday.

The 7.0 magnitude quake struck some 11 miles northeast of the resort city in the southwestern state of Guerrero. At least one person was killed, buildings were damaged and rockslides littered a major highway, but the temblor didn't cause widespread damage.

It did rattle nerves though.

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The U.S. pledged tens of millions more dollars to help Haiti recover from the August 14 earthquake that killed more than 2,000 people and left more than 12,000 injured. USAID Administrator Samantha Power was in Haiti today.

BARADÈRES, Haiti — By the time the U.S. military helicopter touched down at the lone soccer field in the remote hillside town of Baradères, hundreds of Haitians stood in a ring around the field, men, women and children alike.

Out of the back of the Chinook, a handful of soldiers tossed out 4,500 pounds of cardboard boxes packed with rice, leaving them piled in a heap at center field. After just 10 minutes on the ground, the helicopter was gone, flying on to the next remote town full of people in need.

MEXICO CITY — These days the Mexican capital is a top spot for travelers eager to emerge from coronavirus lockdowns. The megalopolis has long lured tourists with its mix of modern and ancient, and this summer, there's even more history to entice: Mexico is marking 500 years since the Spanish conquistadors, and their Indigenous allies, laid siege to the city, leading to the downfall of the Aztec Empire.

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A large sinkhole has been growing at a farm in Mexico since May. It's already swallowed a house, and two dogs had to be rescued from the hole last week.

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Updated June 6, 2021 at 5:32 PM ET

When Vice President Kamala Harris arrives in Guatemala on Sunday for her first foreign trip in office, she'll follow the same politically treacherous path President Joe Biden took when he was in the role. The mission: to help solve deep-seated problems driving tens of thousands of Central American people to try to seek asylum at the U.S-Mexico border.

"She is really picking up where then-Vice President Biden left off," said Symone Sanders, press secretary to Harris.

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MEXICO CITY — Mexicans go to the polls this Sunday in the largest elections Mexico has every held, in sheer numbers of posts to fill. This has also become one of the most violent campaign seasons. Organized crime gangs are mainly taking the blame for the killings of 35 candidates so far.

Every seat in the lower house of Mexico's Congress is in play, as well as nearly half of the country's governorships and thousands of mayoral and local legislative posts.

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National police in Nicaragua have raided the offices of two prominent opposition figures, both children of a former president, in the latest move by President Daniel Ortega to crackdown on critics ahead of presidential elections this November.

Editor's note: The fight against disinformation has become a facet of nearly every story NPR international correspondents cover, from vaccine hesitancy to authoritarian governments spreading lies. This and other stories by correspondents around the globe focus on different tactics to combat disinformation, the impacts they've had and what other countries might learn from them.


MEXICO CITY — COVID-19 is ravaging Latin America, but one country, Nicaragua, insists it's tackling the pandemic better than any of its neighbors.

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Updated April 16, 2021 at 3:27 PM ET

A generation of Cuban revolutionaries who seized power more than six decades ago, directly challenging the U.S. and later pushing Washington and Moscow to the brink of nuclear war, is set to exit the stage.

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In Mexico, where less than 5% of the population has received a COVID-19 vaccine dose, the rich and well-connected have found a faster way to get their hands on one: travel north.

Some Mexicans with family ties or dual citizenship in the United States, or who just can afford the airfare, are heading to the U.S. to get vaccinated faster than the many months of waiting for one back home.

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Finally today, so you might not be surprised that a record titled "Preacher's Kid" by a musician whose father was a pastor would take the top spot on the iTunes Christian album chart. That happened last month with the new album by Grace Semler Baldrige, who performs as Semler. But the lyrics on that album tell a different story than the one you might be expecting.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "JESUS FROM TEXAS")

SEMLER: (Singing) My mom turned 18 in the 1960s, and she doesn't remember Stonewall.

U.S. tourists aren't welcome in most countries around the world because of the high number of coronavirus cases surging in the United States. But at least one country is keeping its borders open: Mexico. And many Americans, keen to escape the cold or lockdowns, are flocking to its stunning beaches.

On a recent weekend in Cabo San Lucas, one of Mexico's top tourist destinations, Sharlea Watkins and her friends downed beers at a restaurant overlooking the city's marina.

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American tourists are not allowed in most countries right now, but Mexico is an exception. And people are going despite what the CDC says, which is, of course, don't do that. Here's NPR's Carrie Kahn.

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Artists and activists achieved something rare in Cuba. They held a peaceful protest. At first, it seemed the communist government would consider their demands for greater freedom of expression. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports on what happened next.

At the request of the U.S. government, a New York federal judge has dropped all drug trafficking and conspiracy charges against Mexico's former defense secretary, Salvador Cienfuegos Zepeda.

During a Wednesday morning hearing, U.S. District Judge Carol Bagley Amon said she found no reason to "doubt the sincerity of the government's position" and granted the request. U.S. Attorney General William Barr had asked for the dismissal, stating that important foreign policy considerations outweighed the government's prosecution interests in the case.

Mexico's president says he's not ready to send felicitaciones to President-elect Joe Biden, saying he wants to wait for U.S. authorities to certify Biden formally as the victor.

"We cannot meddle in the politics of other countries. ... We have to be respectful," President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said Monday at his regular morning news conference.

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Democratic lawmakers are demanding more information from the Trump administration about an incident in January in which U.S. agents working in Guatemala rounded up U.S.-bound Honduran migrants and transported them back to the Guatemala-Honduras border.

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