Asma Khalid

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"I fear for my life."

That's what reporter Lourdes Maldonado told Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference nearly three years ago.

Last Sunday night, Maldonado was shot dead outside of her home in Tijuana.

She is the second journalist to be murdered in the city in less than a week — the third killed in Mexico already this year — which has cast a pall on reporters there, as they take photos of their colleagues' dead bodies and write about and investigate their deaths.

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President Biden and his White House on Thursday tried to clean up comments he made about Russia during a lengthy news conference the previous day.

On Wednesday, Biden had predicted Russia would invade Ukraine, but suggested there was a split among NATO members about how to respond if Moscow took action that stopped short of sending its troops across the border — something Biden referred to as a "minor incursion." He said:

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It was a solemn day on Capitol Hill where President Biden and other leaders, mostly Democrats, gathered to mark a day that shook this country.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Like the many Americans who have stuck close to home during the pandemic, President Joe Biden limited his time traveling around the United States this year, breaking with his recent predecessors who all hit the road more frequently during their first years in office.

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It was a light-hearted moment at the end of the first diplomatic trip abroad for Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff.

Before she got on Air Force Two to return to Washington, Harris, who loves to cook, made a quick stop at E. Dehillerin, the iconic purveyor of cookware.

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Updated November 9, 2021 at 12:27 PM ET

Vice President Kamala Harris is in Paris this week, her third international trip this year. But in contrast to her first two, where she met with individual heads of state and focused on bilateral relationships, this is the first where Harris is the top White House official at a large gathering of world leaders.

There's an old saying that all politics is local, but that doesn't seem so apt anymore.

In Virginia, thorny cultural issues that have divided people across the country like race and vaccine mandates are all jumbled up as voters decide who to pick as their new governor on Tuesday.

GOP nominee Glenn Youngkin plainly stated that if he wins a state that's become reliable for Democrats, it will ripple across the country.

2021 Tiny Desk Contest winner Neffy recently claimed her Contest prize, performing her very own Tiny Desk concert. But NPR Music discovered thousands of up-and-coming artists through this year's Contest, and Weekend Edition is highlighting some standout entries this fall.

Countries around the globe have tried lifting pandemic restrictions in the hopes that somehow getting herd immunity will stop the spread of the virus, only to see more coronvarius infections.

A new study focusing on Iran sheds light on what happens when we try to control the spread of COVID-19 through the notion of herd immunity over other measures — say like shutdowns or vaccines.

Prosecutors have now charged numerous members of the group in connection with the attack on the U.S. capitol.

But newly-leaked membership info shows dozens of state and local government officials also have ties to the far-right militia organization.

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President Biden has made a clean break with the policies of his predecessor in many areas. But not when it comes to trade with China.

The Biden administration isn't scrapping a trade deal brokered by former President Donald Trump in the final year of his presidency. Instead, it plans to pressure China for not meeting its promises made under that deal.

The Biden administration also plans to broadly maintain Trump's tariffs on U.S. imports of Chinese goods, though it will reopen an exclusion process to provide exemptions for certain goods.

When President Biden was running for office, he described the steep tariffs on Chinese imports put in place by then-President Donald Trump as hurting U.S. consumers, farmers and manufacturers.

But nine months into his time in the White House, there has been no sign that Biden is preparing to quickly abandon the use of Trump's signature tariffs.

After a lengthy review that has frustrated U.S. business groups, who say the tariffs have been an unfair burden, U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai plans to give a major speech on the U.S.-China trade relationship on Monday.

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When President Biden looked into the cameras last week and firmly declared that "the war in Afghanistan is now over," his words were, in his view, the culmination of a central campaign promise.

In the summer of 2019, Biden delivered a speech laying out the blueprint for his foreign policy agenda. He argued that it was "past time to end the forever wars, which have cost us untold blood and treasure."

A young boy who struggles to fit in at school, besties who are polar opposites and a middle school kid who learns to be himself through a school presentation — those are just a few of the stories that author LeUyen Pham thinks the middle schooler in your life (or frankly, just anyone who loves a good book) would enjoy. Pham has written and illustrated more than 100 books for kids, so we asked her to recommend some of her favorite reads for kids heading back to school.

Updated August 26, 2021 at 1:10 PM ET

In January 2002, when the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan reopened for the first time since 1989, Ambassador Ryan Crocker said the first member of Congress to visit him in Kabul was the then-senator from Delaware, Joe Biden.

"One of his really great qualities, I thought, was his driving need to see things for himself ... and I just really respected that," Crocker said, pointing out that Biden also visited Iraq many times.

Updated August 5, 2021 at 7:08 PM ET

Major automakers and the Biden administration are mapping out a route toward a future where Americans drive a lot more electric vehicles.

President Biden, standing before a display of electric trucks and SUVs and surrounded by union officials and auto executives, signed an executive order Thursday setting a target that half of all new vehicles sold in the U.S. in 2030 be zero-emission cars, which would include plug-in hybrids.

Maureen Nicholas says she had no ideal presidential candidate in the last election.

"I voted for Biden, but I didn't want to," the former Republican said as she walked across a Walmart parking lot in Easton, Pa.

Nicholas said that she personally feels lucky, but that the overall economy feels pretty bad these days.

"Price increases — astronomical," she said. "Health care — it just seems like it's out of control."

Vice President Harris is leading the Biden administration's efforts on voting rights. She spoke to NPR White House correspondent Asma Khalid on Tuesday ahead of President Biden's address on the issue and just before she met with Texas Democratic lawmakers who fled the state in an attempt to block a GOP voting bill.

With voting rights legislation stalled in the Senate because of Republican opposition, Vice President Harris suggested that she has talked to senators about exceptions to the legislative filibuster but said she will not be publicly negotiating an issue that the White House insists is up to lawmakers, she told NPR in an interview Tuesday.

"I believe that of all of the issues that the United States Congress can take up, the right to vote is the right that unlocks all the other rights," Harris said. "And for that reason, it should be one of its highest priorities."

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