Sarah Delia

At this point in her life, Sarah considers home to be a state of mind—not one place. Before joining the WFAE news team, she was hosting and reporting in the deep south in Birmingham, Alabama. In past lives she was a northerner having worked and lived in Indiana, Maine, and New York City. She grew up in Virginia and attended James Madison University in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley.

Sarah got her start in radio at WXHM, her college radio station where she hosted a talk show, a music program, and helped manage the student run station. It’s also where she made lifelong friends and discovered a love for talking into microphones.

Sarah has interned and worked at NPR in Washington DC, interned and freelanced for WNYC, and attended the Salt Institute for Radio Documentary Studies.

She enjoys telling stories that are off the beaten path and she’s excited to dive into the arts and culture scene in Charlotte. In her spare time Sarah loves to paint, collect vintage birdcages, pick through old vinyl, spend time with her pets, and turn claw foot bathtubs into couches. 

When accusations surfaced that Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old, Raleigh lawyer Catherine Lawson responded with the hash tag #MeAt14. She tweeted a photo of herself at that age with the words: "Can’t consent at 14. Not in Alabama. Not anywhere."

It caught on and thousands used the hash tag to tweet pictures of themselves as a way to emphasize that children that age can’t consent to sex. Lawson spoke with WFAE’s Sarah Delia.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court has again ruled North Carolina lawmakers illegally used race to draw political district lines. Monday's decision upholds a lower court's ruling and may lead to a special election as early as this year. 

And now for something sweet on the eve of the 2016 Election. It’s an issue everyone can support no matter who you’re voting for: the power of desserts. Two bakers in Asheville have resurrected a tasty treat from the 1700’s known as Election cake. WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke with the bakers who are out to “Make America Cake Again.”

A day after the second presidential debate, Donald Trump’s running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence was in Charlotte. During a town hall rally Pence spent his time talking about the economy and health care for veterans.

He also broached the subject of recorded lewd remarks Donald Trump made about women about a decade ago that became public last week.

WFAE’s Sarah Delia was at the rally today and spoke with Pence supporters. 

The sounds of a typical weekday in Charlotte’s Uptown have returned. Though there is still a sense of unease and restlessness in the city after the shooting death of Keith Scott and as protests continue.

But in the wake of this emotionally raw time for Charlotte, art has emerged in the center city. WFAE’s Sarah Delia took a walk around Uptown to hear from artists who are trying to help heal Charlotte through their work.

Throughout the morning we heard from WFAE reporters who were on the ground in Charlotte's Uptown last night, city officials, and from the people who protested. We've pieced together our complete coverage from Thursday's broadcast of Morning Edition to make sure you don't miss a story. 

This week, we start off by discussing final early voting plans for 33 counties that couldn't reach their own agreement, including Mecklenburg. Then, what kind of impression did Hillary Clinton leave after her speech at Johnson C. Smith University? 

WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College talks maps and laps with WFAE's Sarah Delia. 

This week, we start off by taking a look at maps, as a group of retired bipartisan  judges tried their hand at redrawing the state's congressional districts. Then we discuss the final lap of the 2016 presidential race. WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College talks maps and laps with WFAE's Sarah Delia.

Everyone deals with stress in different ways. For some it’s meditation or running. For one woman in Concord, it’s an arcade game in the midst of what some might say is making a bit of a comeback...pinball. She’s so good in fact, she’s ranked as the number one player in the state of North Carolina. WFAE’s Sarah Delia’s caught up with the local pinball wizard and has this story.


The Confederate battle flag flew above the South Carolina capitol or on its grounds for 44 years. That changed after the massacre at Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston. Photos emerged of accused killer Dylann Roof with the flag. Demands to take it down intensified, and the Confederate flag was gone three weeks later.

It was sent to a state museum for display. But as Sarah Delia reports from Columbia, that display isn’t going to happen anytime soon.

For the past year, former Charlotte city councilman and state lawmaker Malcolm Graham has grappled with the loss of his sister, Cynthia Graham Hurd. She was one of the nine shot and killed at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston a year ago. 

The City of Asheville goes by another name, Altamont. That's how it appeared in a book by early twentieth century writer Thomas Wolfe.  He called the place home, but not in an especially fond way. His novel Look Homeward Angel about a young writer trying to break free of his small town and family was largely autobiographical and brought him literary acclaim. A new film which takes place in New York, called Genius, portrays Wolfe and his working relationship with his editor. As Jude Law got ready to fill Wolfe's literary shoes, it wasn't the big city he had to go to fully understand the writer, it was Asheville, and one place in particular there. 

On Tuesday Governor Pat McCrory was on the radio as a guest on The John Boy and Billy Big Show. He had some thoughts to share about House Bill 2 at least one of which was inaccurate regarding Bruce Springsteen's canceled performance. 


A few days before a nearly sold out show in Greensboro, North Carolina Bruce Springsteen canceled in protest of House Bill 2. Cirque Du Soleil, the rock group Boston and Pearl Jam have also canceled shows in opposition the law.

WFAE’s Arts and Culture Reporter Sarah Delia has this rundown of some other reactions in the arts community.