Jeff Tiberii

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (ME) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now WUNC, dates back 15 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Marketplace , Here & Now and the BBC. He has been recognized with seven regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, dozens of other honors, and has twice been named radio reporter of the year in the Carolinas. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

 

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that federal courts can't intervene in cases where state lawmakers have aggressively drawn political boundaries to benefit one political party over another, a new front in the nation's redistricting battles opens Monday in a North Carolina courtroom.

Governor Roy Cooper called a Republican-backed state spending plan a failure on Friday morning, as he stated his intentions to veto the budget, while again calling on legislators to expand Medicaid.

North Carolina farmers are among the geopolitical victims in the ongoing trade war between the United States and China. Following Hurricanes Matthew and Florence, farmers across the state are now weathering the impacts of tariffs.

State Supreme Court Chief Justice Cheri Beasley would lose half of her staff under a proposed budget cut by the North Carolina Senate. The Republican budget seeks to eliminate three of the six staff positions for Beasley, a Democrat, who was elevated to chief justice in March.

Updated at 2:38 p.m.

Senate Republicans have released a proposed North Carolina government budget that emphasizes state employee salary increases and puts more in reserves than a similar spending bill from House counterparts.

State lawmakers engaged in some self-induced chaos as part of the biennial exercise of ‘crossover’ this week.

The legislative deadline known as crossover is an arbitrary parliamentary deadline during which bills must receive approval from one chamber and have crossed over to the other chamber, or be relegated to the legislative dumpster.

Businessman Greg Lindberg arrived on the North Carolina political scene in 2017 with a big fat check book. Previously unknown in political circles, he started making six-figure contributions and landed squarely on the radar of campaigns across the state.

Mark Meadows, special congressional elections, and hands-free driving are all fair game on this week's podcast.

Chuck McGrady sits down for a conversation about some of the notable legislation he is pursuing this year at the North Carolina General Assembly.

The Republican state representative from Henderson County has introduced a bill to establish independent redistricting, wants to change ABC regulations, and continues to have an eye on environmental issues.

McGrady also discusses his time leading a summer camp and his friendship with Congressman John Lewis.

Walter Jones, a second generation North Carolina Congressman who was both a Republican and a Democrat during his time in public office, died Sunday on his 76th birthday. 

North Carolina legislators are providing several options to vote under a proposed bill that would require photo identification at the polls. Earlier this month voters gave lawmakers approval to amend the state constitution to mandate ID at the ballot box.

With Republicans trying to maintain control of the United States House, three races in North Carolina have emerged as battleground districts. And one of those covers part of the Triangle, where voters are choosing between Republican incumbent George Holding and Democratic challenger Linda Coleman. 

The latest legal fight between the Governor and state lawmakers played out in a state court this week. At issue is whether proposals that would change the balance of powers in state government should remain on the ballot this fall.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, discuss the proposed constitutional amendments, as well as one open U.S. House race, and how the press should respond to frequent attacks from President Trump.

By the time presidential candidates start descending on North Carolina in 2020, voters may be required to show a photo identification before voting. State legislators filed a proposal last week that would ask voters to decide whether a photo ID requirement should be added to the current qualifications to vote.

Governor Roy Cooper vetoed a Republican-approved state spending plan this week, citing more could be done for public education.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, discuss the anticipated executive veto of the budget, as well as one farm measure that has divided some Republicans. Also this week at the North Carolina General Assembly, legislators introduced a proposal to change the state constitution and require photo identification in order to vote in-person.

Lawmakers engaged in some heated debate during budget week at the North Carolina General Assembly.

The conversation over education funding, local earmarks, and missed opportunities carries over into this week's review of politics.

Duane Hall stands behind a large wooden desk on the second floor of his law office in downtown Raleigh. The Governor’s Mansion is visible out the window. That’s where Hall used to shoot baskets with his friend, Governor Roy Cooper, and where he proposed to his now fiancé last December. It doesn’t feel so close anymore. These days Representative Hall is, perhaps, the loneliest man in North Carolina politics.

Susan Roberts, political science professor at Davidson College, joins this edition of the WUNCPolitics Podcast.

Roberts teaches about the presidency and offers her thoughts on what makes Donald Trump both unique, and similar to other commanders-in-chief. She also makes a bold prediction for the next speaker of the U.S. House, and shares which team she will be rooting for.

Denver Post reporter John Frank joins this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast to discuss the findings of a new independent report about sexual harassment at Colorado's Capitol.

Patrick Woodie is President and CEO of the NC Rural Center, and is nearly complete with an 80-county road trip across the state.

He sits down for this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast to discuss broadband, healthcare, and improving the quality of life in our state's rural regions.

China issued the latest shot in a looming trade war this week, announcing it would increase tariffs on pork products. That decision could have an impact on farmers in eastern North Carolina counties. In an unrelated swine development, a series of nuisance lawsuits were back in federal court.

It was a relatively mundane week in North Carolina Politics - with good news for the Green Party, an ongoing messaging battle over the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, and some new details in the Cambridge Analytica saga.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, discuss some of this week's stories with WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii.

Bob Orr is a former justice on the North Carolina Supreme Court. These days, he is an advocate for college athletes, remains passionate about constitutional law, and has been reading about Reconstruction-era history.

Orr, a one-time gubernatorial candidate, discusses those topics, as well as firearms and the likelihood of a 'blue wave' on the latest edition of the WUNCPolitics Podcast.

For the first time since 2016, North Carolina has a state board of elections. The nine-member panel was seated on Wednesday.

Also this week, questions emerged about money that the 2014 Thom Tillis U.S. Senate campaign spent on Cambridge Analytica. And, a proposals for new gun regulations was rolled out by Democrats, who called the issue non-partisan.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, discuss some of this week's stories with WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii.

 

On this week's WUNC Politics Podcast, Colin Campbell of the NC Insider sits down for a conversation about writing his weekly column, an ongoing feud over the state board of elections, and harassment protocols at the General Assembly.

He and WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii also talk beer on boats, and a little NCAA Basketball.

Democratic state lawmaker Duane Hall (D-Wake) has no plans to step down from his elected post, despite calls from some powerful members of his party. Hall has been accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women, but disputes the allegations and the story, which was published by NC Policy Watch.

On this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, Billy Ball, of NC Policy Watch, and Elena Schneider, of Politico, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii to discuss the latest political news.

(Updated at 2:15 p.m.) A state lawmaker accused of sexual harassment says he will not resign from his seat, despite calls from leading members of his party to step down.

With candidates filing to run for state legislative seats, another lawsuit was filed this week, challenging a few of the political boundaries.

Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, and Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii to discuss this latest redistricting challenge, as well as what firearm, or school safety policy changes, may be feasible in the wake of a school shooting in Florida that left 17 people dead. They also discuss the influence of famed Evangelist Billy Graham, who died this week at the age of 99.


North Carolina icon Billy Graham passed away Wednesday at the age of 99. As the renowned evangelist is being remembered around the world, the organization he started in 1950 begins a new era without him.

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