Bruce Warren

Bruce Warren is assistant general manager for programming of WXPN in Philadelphia. Besides serving as executive producer of World Café, Warren also contributes to Paste magazine and writes for two blogs: Some Velvet Blog and WXPN's All About The Music Blog.

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of World Cafe, we'll be looking back and posting playlists from each year of the show. As music has evolved over the years, so have our playlists, which have grown to reflect many genres and styles of music.

As part of World Cafe's 30th anniversary, we'll be bringing you special features that celebrate the music, the conversation and the legacy of the Cafe every week for 30 weeks.

One thing that's so important to us at World Cafe is boosting emerging artists – and then continuing to support them on their journey. There are so many artists who have visited multiple times, who we've gotten to watch (and hear) grow – sometimes into big, big stars.

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of World Cafe, we'll be looking back and posting playlists from each year of the show. As music has evolved over the years so have our playlists, growing to reflect many genres and styles of music.

At 10 a.m. ET, on Oct. 14 1991, from the third floor of WXPN's broadcast studios in a turn-of-the-century building in West Philadelphia, original World Cafe host David Dye, along with a small production staff, debuted the very first Cafe. The then-new national show went out live to its five original affiliates, including WFUV in New York, KUMD in Duluth, Minnesota, KUNI (now Iowa Public Radio) and, of course, WXPN.

This year, the XPoNential Music Festival, presented by Subaru, returns in person on the Camden Waterfront in Camden, N.J. With a lineup of established and up-and-coming artists, the festival has offered an unparalleled experience for music discovery, delighting audiences of all ages for more than a decade.

From her third LP Jubilee and bestselling memoir Crying in H Mart, to her work on the score for the video game Sable, Japanese Breakfast frontperson Michelle Zauner has been generating so much buzz that it's no wonder she's been selling out shows across the country. Zauner's homecoming to Philadelphia is no different, extending her stop to five nights at Union Transfer.

Eighty years ago, in Duluth, Minn., a baby named Robert Allen Zimmerman was born. He'd grow up to become one of the greatest songwriters of all time. You know him now as Bob Dylan. To celebrate his 80th birthday, we've compiled an entire show's worth of Dylan songs, as performed by artists who love him.

As a keepsake of World Cafe's Bob Dylan Octogintennial Extravaganza, we're sharing a Spotify playlist with songs from the show and more.

Nashville-based label Dualtone Records is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year with a special collection of songs called Amerikinda: 20 Years Of Dualtone. The compilation album is being released on Aug. 6, and features Dualtone artists and alumni including The Lumineers, Brett Dennen, Gregory Alan Isakov, Mt. Joy, Hayes Carll, Shovels & Rope, Langhorne Slim and others, all covering each other's songs in celebration of the label's landmark birthday.

"I think it was the first time I heard Brook Benton's 'Rainy Night In Georgia,'" Dan Auerbach says during a call from his Nashville studio about discovering Tony Joe White. "I'd heard the song a bunch already, and I just figured it was a Ray Charles song or something. But then I heard Tony Joe's version and everything about it just blew my mind."

Much of what distinguishes New Orleans today from other American cities can be traced back to French and African influences from Haiti. The cultural ties go back more than 200 years, when 10,000 free and enslaved people left what was then the French colony of Saint Domingue during the country's revolution. NOLA's multi-cultural DNA is its calling card, and it's reflected in the food, architecture, art, and most notably, music.

Right from the start of Kendall Morgan's "Rescue Me," the first thing you notice is her confident, powerful voice. It welcomes you in with a warm embrace. The Nashville-based singer-songwriter draws on a soulful blend of Americana and R&B with flourishes of gospel. Her EP, produced by J. LBS and due out early this year, includes "Rescue Me" and "Okay," two songs you'll see her perform in this exclusive mini concert for World Cafe.

They'll Never Keep Us Down is the title of a forthcoming EP from Nashville singer-songwriter Kelsey Waldon. The EP takes its title from the Hazel Dickens song and serves as a statement of allyship for social justice reform. The EP includes covers of protest and empowerment songs by Kris Kristofferson ("The Law Is For The Protection Of The People"), John Prine ("Sam Stone"), "Ohio" by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, "I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free," popularized by Nina Simone, and others.

Sometimes bass guitar can be an overlooked instrument. Sometimes it gets relegated to the background. But today, it's a 62-song playlist that's all about that bass. We asked our social followers "What is the greatest bass riff of all time?" and they delivered.

In 2019, singer-songwriter Anthony D'Amato spent a month living in New Orleans and made an EP called Five Songs From New Orleans. He recorded it in the 19th century house he was living in with some local musicians and acoustic instruments.

The XPoNential Music Festival, presented by Subaru, offers an unparalleled experience for music discovery. With a lineup of established and up-and-coming artists, the XPoNential Music Festival has been pleasing audiences of all ages for more than a decade at the Camden Waterfront in Camden, N.J.

Without gospel music there never would have been an Aretha Franklin, an Elvis Presley, a Ray Charles, a James Brown, or an Al Green.

It's 1988. A gallon of gas is about 90 cents. Movie tickets average $3.50 a flick. And while you were at the movies, chances are you caught Rain Man, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Big or Beetlejuice. On television, Miami Vice was still going strong, as St. Elsewhere was ending. In August, Yo! MTV Raps debuted.

It was Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit's night to shine at the annual Americana Honors and Awards show Wednesday night at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville.

Isbell and his band walked away with three of the night's biggest awards: Album of the Year for The Nashville Sound, Song of the Year for "If We Were Vampires," and Duo/Group of the Year.