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Using Tons Of Data To Analyze The State Of The Environment In NC

North Carolina Conservation Network found that 5% of the census tracts in the state account for half of the net growth in households since 2010; those are shaded in orange on the map and give a sense of the scale of households moving to ex-urban areas.
North Carolina Conservation Network found that 5% of the census tracts in the state account for half of the net growth in households since 2010; those are shaded in orange on the map and give a sense of the scale of households moving to ex-urban areas.

North Carolina Conservation Network just released its first-ever “State of the Environment” report. It includes data analysis, polling and more than 100 indicators that measure the overall well-being of the environment and the people of North Carolina. Host Frank Stasio talks with the North Carolina Conservation Network's policy director Grady McCallie and their environmental justice, air and materials policy manager Jamie Cole about it's first-ever 'State of the Environment' report.

The report is broken down into categories including the economy, infrastructure and the social fabric of the state. North Carolina Conservation Network singled out three themes that are central to understanding the state’s environmental future: curbing greenhouse gas emissions, working toward racial equity and building resilience.

Host Frank Stasio talks to Grady McCallie and Jamie Cole from the North Carolina Conservation Network about some of the trends identified in the report. McCallie is the policy director and Cole is the environmental justice, air and materials policy manager.

Copyright 2019 North Carolina Public Radio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.
Amanda Magnus grew up in Maryland and went to high school in Baltimore. She became interested in radio after an elective course in the NYU journalism department. She got her start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio, but she knew public radio was for her when she interned at WNYC. She later moved to Madison, where she worked at Wisconsin Public Radio for six years. In her time there, she helped create an afternoon drive news magazine show, called Central Time. She also produced several series, including one on Native American life in Wisconsin. She spends her free time running, hiking, and roller skating. She also loves scary movies.