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How Does Coal Fit Into Energy Policy In North Carolina And The US?

A coal-fired power plant.
A coal-fired power plant.
A coal-fired power plant.
Credit eutrophication&hypoxia via Flickr, Creative Commons
A coal-fired power plant.

The state Department of Environmental Quality ordered Duke Energy to excavate six coal ash ponds last week. Duke wanted to leave the ash in place and cover it, which is a much cheaper solution. The energy company estimates it will cost an additional $4 to $5 billion to clean up these six sites.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Elizabeth Ouzts, a reporter for Southeast Energy News, about questions surrounding North Carolina’s coal ash ponds and Steven Sexton, an assistant professor of public policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, about the role coal plays in U.S. energy policy.

Last week North Carolina House Democrats filed a bill to block Duke from passing this cost on to its customers. Host Frank Stasio talks to Elizabeth Ouzts about the coal ash cleanup and about the larger questions surrounding North Carolina’s coal ash ponds. Ouzts is a reporter for Southeast Energy News.

Stasio also talks with Steven Sexton about the role coal plays in U.S. energy policy. Sexton, an assistant professor of public policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, discusses the costs and benefits of using coal, natural gas and renewable energy sources.

Copyright 2019 North Carolina Public Radio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.
Amanda Magnus grew up in Maryland and went to high school in Baltimore. She became interested in radio after an elective course in the NYU journalism department. She got her start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio, but she knew public radio was for her when she interned at WNYC. She later moved to Madison, where she worked at Wisconsin Public Radio for six years. In her time there, she helped create an afternoon drive news magazine show, called Central Time. She also produced several series, including one on Native American life in Wisconsin. She spends her free time running, hiking, and roller skating. She also loves scary movies.