© 2024 Blue Ridge Public Radio
Blue Ridge Mountains banner background
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

The Blackspace Afronauts Release Their First Album

Some of the Blackspace Afronauts. From left to right: JAMM, Naima, J Rowdy, Lil Monsta, and Zone.
Amanda Magnus
/
WUNC
Some of the Blackspace Afronauts. From left to right: JAMM, Naima, J Rowdy, Lil Monsta, and Zone.

Two years ago, the Afrofuturist digital makerspace in Durham started offering hip-hop workshops. Local students gathered at Blackspace to learn about writing and met each Friday night in a public park to rap and make beats. Out of those gatherings, a group of students – who call themselves the Blackspace Afronauts – put together their first album: “Revenge Of The Afronauts.” Host Frank Stasio talks to the program director for Blackspace Hip Hop, Josh Rowsey (J Rowdy) and four of his students, Jeremiah Henderson (JAMM), Zach Woodard (Zone.), Naima Harrell (Naima), and Lourdes Pietri (Lil Monsta) who have become the hip hop group Blackspace Afronauts. They perform live in our studio.

Host Frank Stasio talks to the program director for Blackspace Hip Hop, Josh Rowsey (J Rowdy), about the process of making the album. Stasio is also joined by artists featured on the album: Jeremiah Henderson (JAMM), Zach Woodard (Zone.), Naima Harrell (Naima), and Lourdes Pietri (Lil Monsta). They perform tracks live in studio and talk about their experiences in Blackspace Hip Hop.

The album release party is on Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Pinhook in Durham. The Blackspace Afronauts will also be at the Unscripted Hotel in Durham on Friday, Oct. 19

Copyright 2018 North Carolina Public Radio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.
Amanda Magnus grew up in Maryland and went to high school in Baltimore. She became interested in radio after an elective course in the NYU journalism department. She got her start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio, but she knew public radio was for her when she interned at WNYC. She later moved to Madison, where she worked at Wisconsin Public Radio for six years. In her time there, she helped create an afternoon drive news magazine show, called Central Time. She also produced several series, including one on Native American life in Wisconsin. She spends her free time running, hiking, and roller skating. She also loves scary movies.