© 2024 Blue Ridge Public Radio
Blue Ridge Mountains banner background
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Standing Rock Marks Success For Native Water Activists

Native Americans drum and sing at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline.
David Goldman
/
AP
Native Americans drum and sing at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline.
Native Americans drum and sing at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline.
Credit David Goldman / AP
/
AP
Native Americans drum and sing at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and their supporters are celebrating after the Army Corps of Engineers announced it will block a pipeline from being built under a dammed off portion of the Missouri River.

Host Frank Stasio speaks with NPR Reporter Nathan Rott who is in North Dakota. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians member Gilliam Jackson, and Keith Richotte, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa member and UNC law professor, give their perspectives on the news from Standing Rock.

NPR Reporter Nathan Rott who is in North Dakota, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians member Gilliam Jackson, and Keith Richotte, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa member and UNC law professor, give their perspectives on the news from Standing Rock.

Copyright 2016 North Carolina Public Radio

Laura Pellicer is a producer with The State of Things (hyperlink), a show that explores North Carolina through conversation. Laura was born and raised in Montreal, Quebec, a city she considers arrestingly beautiful, if not a little dysfunctional. She worked as a researcher for CBC Montreal and also contributed to their programming as an investigative journalist, social media reporter, and special projects planner. Her work has been nominated for two Canadian RTDNA Awards. Laura loves looking into how cities work, pursuing stories about indigenous rights, and finding fresh voices to share with listeners. Laura is enamored with her new home in North Carolina—notably the lush forests, and the waves where she plans on moonlighting as a mediocre surfer.
Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.