Paul Kiefer

Paul Kiefer is a born-and-bred Seattleite and a lifelong talking-to-strangers enthusiast. He began his work in public radio with KUOW's RadioActive Youth Media program and never looked back: he has since worked as a headline producer, fact-checker, and independent producer, and he dreams of a career as a producer for public radio. Paul is a rising senior at Pomona College, where he is working on a degree in history with a specialization in the history of Muslims in the Americas and Europe. If all else fails, he will fall back on his abilities as a cook, barber, and chatterbox (in English, Spanish, and Arabic) to keep himself busy.

Ocracoke Health Center CEO Cheryl Ballance estimates that anywhere from 8,000-10,000 people visit Ocracoke Island on any given summer weekend. Many visitors catch a ferry back to Cape Hatteras after less than a day, but hundreds of vacation rentals and hotel rooms are consistently filled from late spring to early fall. During those months, the staff of the tiny clinic are stretched to their limits.

The coordinated immigration raids slated for this week did not take place at the scale announced by top administration officials.

One of Imam Shane Atkinson’s first face-to-face encounters with Muslims took place while he was working at a tannery in Sturgis, Mississippi.

A hairdresser, a secretary, a preacher and a wrestler stand in the sun in a line of fellow pilgrims. They come from small towns in every nook and cranny of the South, their home-cooked lunches in hand, to seek the counsel and blessings of their patron saint, St. Elvis of Tupelo. While they gather together at the gates of Graceland, the pilgrims swap stories – some poignant, some silly, and only a few related to Elvis – to pass the time.

Word is getting out that North Carolina is a great place to live. The state has been readily attracting people from other parts of the country in recent years, but the rising tide has not lifted all boats.