Mark Rumsey

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Hillary Clinton's running mate Virginia Senator Tim Kaine campaigned in Greensboro Wednesday. He touted Clinton's economic plans and highlighted North Carolina's importance in this year's presidential race. After the rally, the Democratic vice presidential nominee spoke with WFAE's Mark Rumsey by phone.

A federal appeals court had some strong language in last week’s decision that struck down North Carolina's 2013 voting law overhaul. The judges concluded that lawmakers had deliberately passed the law with the intent of curbing voter turnout among African-Americans. 

Sen. Bob Rucho, R-Mecklenburg, says the court should be "embarrassed" by that conclusion. He was one of the architects of the voting law.

A drug advertised as a “legal psychoactive” would be off limits to minors in North Carolina under legislation nearing final approval in the General Assembly.

North Carolina public schools have received two sets of instructions regarding transgender students. The state's House Bill 2 says those students must use the bathroom of the gender on their birth certificate. But recent guidance from the federal government says schools must allow transgender students to use the bathroom of the gender with which they identify.

What is the NC Department of Public Instruction telling school districts to do? "The problem is - what guidance would we give them?" says NC Schools Superintendent June Atkinson. She believes the courts will ultimately rule that students should be allowed to use the restroom that corresponds to their gender identity.  WFAE's Mark Rumsey reports.


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