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Historically Black Community In Asheville Faces Another Destructive Highway Project

Artist, poet and social entrepreneur DeWayne "B-Love" Barton gives a tour of the Burton Street Peace Gardens during their summer plant sale on Saturday, April 25, 2015.
Angeli Wright
/
Asheville Citizen-Times
Artist, poet and social entrepreneur DeWayne "B-Love" Barton gives a tour of the Burton Street Peace Gardens during their summer plant sale on Saturday, April 25, 2015.
Artist, poet and social entrepreneur DeWayne "B-Love" Barton gives a tour of the Burton Street Peace Gardens during their summer plant sale on Saturday, April 25, 2015.
Credit Angeli Wright / Asheville Citizen-Times
/
Asheville Citizen-Times
Artist, poet and social entrepreneur DeWayne "B-Love" Barton gives a tour of the Burton Street Peace Gardens during their summer plant sale on Saturday, April 25, 2015.

A highway expansion project in Asheville is set to destroy several homes in a historically black community for the third time. Parts of the Burton Street Neighborhood in West Asheville were demolished by state highway projects in the 1950s and 1960s. Now the proposed Interstate 26 connection project will go through the neighborhood again.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Asheville Citizen-Times city reporter Joel Burgess and DeWayne Barton, founder and CEO of Hood Huggers International, about the proposed interstate 26 connection which will go through the Burton Street Neighborhood, a historically black community.

This time the Burton Street Neighborhood qualifies as an environmental justice population, which guarantees it state support for funding and improvements.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Asheville Citizen-Times city reporter Joel Burgess about his reporting on the community improvement plan for Burton Street. The Asheville City Council approved the plan in late September. And DeWayne Barton shares his work in the community, from creating the Peace Gardens to creating opportunities for the youth in the neighborhood. Barton is the founder and CEO of Hood Huggers International.

Copyright 2018 North Carolina Public Radio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.
Amanda Magnus grew up in Maryland and went to high school in Baltimore. She became interested in radio after an elective course in the NYU journalism department. She got her start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio, but she knew public radio was for her when she interned at WNYC. She later moved to Madison, where she worked at Wisconsin Public Radio for six years. In her time there, she helped create an afternoon drive news magazine show, called Central Time. She also produced several series, including one on Native American life in Wisconsin. She spends her free time running, hiking, and roller skating. She also loves scary movies.