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Judge Mike Morgan Looks To Shift Political Balance Of NC Supreme Court

Wake County Superior Court Judge Mike Morgan is battling for a seat on the N.C. Supreme Court.
Courtesy Mike Morgan
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Wake County Superior Court Judge Mike Morgan is battling for a seat on the N.C. Supreme Court.
Wake County Superior Court Judge Mike Morgan is battling for a seat on the N.C. Supreme Court.
Credit Courtesy Mike Morgan
/
Wake County Superior Court Judge Mike Morgan is battling for a seat on the N.C. Supreme Court.

The race for a seat in the North Carolina Supreme Court is one of many down-ballot races that may not be top of mind for most North Carolinians. However, this year’s race carries the potential for a significant political shift.

Wake County Superior Court Judge Mike Morgan, a registered Democrat, says the N.C. Supreme Court is becoming increasingly politicized. He is fighting to win the seat of incumbent Justice Bob Edmunds, a registered Republican. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Wake County Superior Court Judge Mike Morgan.

If Morgan succeeds, he will tip the scales securing a 4-3 Democratic majority on the court. Host Frank Stasio talks to Morgan about his candidature and the debate over the politicization of the N.C. Supreme Court. Incumbent Justice Bob Edmunds joined Stasio for an interview at The State of Things studio on Tuesday. 

Early voting for residents of North Carolina starts Thursday. The N.C. State Board of Elections has an online tool to help find your nearest polling station

Copyright 2016 North Carolina Public Radio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.
Laura Pellicer is a producer with The State of Things (hyperlink), a show that explores North Carolina through conversation. Laura was born and raised in Montreal, Quebec, a city she considers arrestingly beautiful, if not a little dysfunctional. She worked as a researcher for CBC Montreal and also contributed to their programming as an investigative journalist, social media reporter, and special projects planner. Her work has been nominated for two Canadian RTDNA Awards. Laura loves looking into how cities work, pursuing stories about indigenous rights, and finding fresh voices to share with listeners. Laura is enamored with her new home in North Carolina—notably the lush forests, and the waves where she plans on moonlighting as a mediocre surfer.