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Carloads of tourists rolled in, stores stocked seafood counters and kitchen workers chopped vegetables Friday as two North Carolina islands reopened to visitors after a weeklong power outage at the height of vacation season.

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the process, history, and political gamesmanship of redistricting.

This week in North Carolina politics, a conversation about redistricting, prosecutor layoffs, and a possible litigation ban at the UNC Center for Civil Rights.

Democrats in the State Senate are pushing for what they call fair redistricting. The legislature meets this month to redraw district maps.

Power has been restored to Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands. Utility crews with Cape Hatteras Electric Cooperative and its contractors completed work earlier Thursday afternoon.

Recently released research from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill projects that unchecked climate change will significantly impact premature deaths associated with air pollution.

A proposed natural gas pipeline would disproportionately impact Native Americans in North Carolina, according to Ryan Emanuel, an associate professor at NC State University and a member of the Lumbee Tribe.

U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows is calling for the elimination of the department within the Congressional Budget Office that scores bills.

The town of Princeville is stepping up recovery efforts after flooding from Hurricane Matthew last fall.

This week in state politics, a plan to repeal Obamacare fizzled in the U.S. Senate. What impact, if any, will that have on North Carolina's congressional delegation?

It has been an intensely divisive time in the North Carolina General Assembly—with disagreements on the budget, LGBT rights, and private nuisance lawsuits against hog farms to name a few. Yet there seems to be near unanimity in the legislature on at least one issue: ballot access.

Governor Roy Cooper has announced his opposition to offshore drilling as the Trump Administration takes steps to reopen oil exploration in the Atlantic. 

In July 2013, North Carolina lawmakers passed the Voter Information Verification Act – known more commonly as voter ID.  It’s a controversial law that was ultimately struck down in federal court for being unconstitutional. Nearly four years later, state legislators are now working on another voter ID bill that would be taken to voters as a constitutional amendment, according to sources.

The nation's largest electric company wants regulators in North Carolina to force consumers to pay nearly $200 million a year to clean up the toxic byproducts of burning coal to generate power. That doesn't sit well with neighbors of the power plants who have been living on bottled water since toxic chemicals appeared in some of their wells.

Conservatives unhappy with the work of a civil rights center at the University of North Carolina say a ban on litigation is meant to spare legal clinics while applying only to academic centers.

Residential areas in western North Carolina have seen an increase in bear activity in the past month, including some especially unusual behavior from a couple of black bears in Asheville and Cashiers. 

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a farewell chat with Reporter Jess Clark, who departs WUNC for an education reporting position at WWNO in New Orleans.

This week in state politics, an overview of the first half of 2017, the heightened nature of partisan politics in North Carolina and the fighting between Governor Roy Cooper and state Legislature.

At least two wind farm developers say they will likely suspend their projects in North Carolina if a proposed moratorium goes into effect. 

Global warming and urbanization are threatening bee populations across the country. One factor in that threat is heat. At high temperatures, bees become unable to reproduce, fly or even walk.

So researchers from North Carolina State University recently set out to see just how much heat local wild bees could handle.

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the end of the 2017 Legislative session, which wrapped up early Friday morning after five and a half months.

State lawmakers are heading home until August. After reaching a state budget deal, lawmakers passed a flurry of bills this week and departed early this morning. House speaker Tim Moore told reporters the legislature will be "in and out for the rest of the year," which is uncommon, but not unprecedented.

House Republicans have opened the door for the chamber to investigate North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall based on a lawmaker's allegations she issued notary public commissions to people who live in the U.S. illegally.

A bill is moving through the North Carolina legislature that could push the country a step closer towards rewriting its founding document.

More than one hundred protesters rallied outside Senator Thom Tillis' Raleigh office Tuesday afternoon calling for the Republican senator to reject his party's bill to replace Obamacare.

Republican state lawmakers are touting their final budget plan, which they say cuts taxes, provides teacher raises, and grows government spending by about 3 percent. Critics, including Democratic Governor Roy Cooper, say the plan fails to keep up with the growth of population and inflation.

The United States Supreme Court will decide if states may draw voting districts to gain a partisan advantage.

The ruling is not expected until next year but will greatly impact North Carolina's voting districts, which are among the most severely gerrymandered in the country.

New research from Duke University shows that in states that have a widespread job loss, college attendance drops significantly among its poorest students.

This week in state politics, a discussion about redistricting, liquor sales on Sunday mornings, and driving too slow in the left lane.

Mitch Kokai of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, join WUNC's Jeff Tiberii to discuss the week's news.

It's being called a political crisis: Partisanship is the worst it's been in decades. Now, a few North Carolina legislators think they might have a solution: Building a political coalition based on their shared youth. Charlotte Democratic Representative Chaz Beasley is 31 years old, and one of the chairs of the new North Carolina Future Caucus.

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