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Democratic state lawmaker Duane Hall (D-Wake) has no plans to step down from his elected post, despite calls from some powerful members of his party. Hall has been accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women, but disputes the allegations and the story, which was published by NC Policy Watch.

On this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, Billy Ball, of NC Policy Watch, and Elena Schneider, of Politico, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii to discuss the latest political news.

The National Rifle Association gave more grant funding to a Concord-based charity than any other school or charity in the nation – by a wide margin.

Speedway Children's Charities received $425,000 from the NRA every year from 2010 through 2016, according to data provided by the Associated Press and analyzed by WUNC.

North Carolina teachers do not want their colleagues not even trained ones to carry guns in school, according to a new Elon University Poll.

Woody Durham, the retired "Voice of the Tar Heels" who called North Carolina football and basketball games for four decades, died Wednesday. He was 76.

(Updated at 2:15 p.m.) A state lawmaker accused of sexual harassment says he will not resign from his seat, despite calls from leading members of his party to step down.

State Superintendent Mark Johnson is asking teachers whether or not they would like to be armed. So far, most say no. Johnson sent an informal, online poll in an email to all of the about 100,000 public school teachers across the state Thursday morning and received more than 19,000 responses in the first 24 hours.

Van der Vaart Returns

Feb 28, 2018

Donald van der Vaart was North Carolina’s top environmental official under former Gov. Pat McCrory.  When Gov. Roy Cooper took office, Van der Vaart demoted himself and was later placed on suspension after writing a controversial opinion piece in an environmental law journal. However, he recently reemerged as a candidate for President Trump's Council on Environmental Quality.

North Carolina doesn't have enough school nurses or counselors, and that's impacting child health across the state. The North Carolina Institute of Medicine and the advocacy group N.C. Child gave the state "D" grades for school health and mental health on its Child Health Report Card.

The proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline promises to bring huge quantities of cheap natural gas to North Carolina, which could slow growth for solar power.

North Carolina is technically the second largest producer of solar energy in America. N.C. State University Energy Economist Harrison Fell explained the state is capable of running seven percent of the energy grid on solar. But, of course, it's not always sunny.

With candidates filing to run for state legislative seats, another lawsuit was filed this week, challenging a few of the political boundaries.

Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, and Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii to discuss this latest redistricting challenge, as well as what firearm, or school safety policy changes, may be feasible in the wake of a school shooting in Florida that left 17 people dead. They also discuss the influence of famed Evangelist Billy Graham, who died this week at the age of 99.


North Carolina icon Billy Graham passed away Wednesday at the age of 99. As the renowned evangelist is being remembered around the world, the organization he started in 1950 begins a new era without him.

Evangelist Billy Graham, the North Carolina icon known as “America’s Pastor” who conducted more than 400 crusades and whose sermons were heard by an estimated two billion people, died Wednesday. He was 99.

There was another mass shooting in the United States this week. That means another round of emotional reactions, social media sparring and carefully delivered messages by elected officials. If recent shootings serve as any example, it's also likely that no legislative action will follow.

State legislators have departed for an extended break, but unsurprisingly, the partisan spats are not quieting down.

This week in North Carolina politics saw disputes over the constitutionality and possible ethical issue stemming from a $57.8 million mitigation fund related to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

Half a century ago, the federal Fair Housing Act banned racial discrimination in lending. But today, African Americans and Latinos continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans at rates sometimes far higher than their white neighbors.

The General Assembly passed a bill Tuesday primarily to address issues with a prior law that reduces class sizes in kindergarten through third grade. While the measure to phase in and better fund those reductions had bipartisan support, Democrats have criticized the bill for tacking on a number of other provisions.

State legislators have adjourned until May after voting to fix a long-standing issue over mandated class sizes, while delaying further action on the GenX water contamination issue.

It was a hectic week in downtown Raleigh, where lawmakers sparred with Governor Roy Cooper, debated the components of a multifaceted bill, and closed in on the 2018 election, which begins Monday with candidate filings.

Lauren Horsch, a reporter with the NC Insider, reviews the week with WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and notes her favorite winter Olympic sport.

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a class size bill, and North Carolina’s redistricting saga are among the issues in the news this week in state politics. Also, how open is North Carolina state’s  government and how accessible is it for journalists and the public to access what happens at the General Assembly?

Four candidates for the North Carolina Senate kick off their campaigns today. They are all Democrats challenging Republican incumbents and they are all white women, none of whom have ever held elected office.

The N.C. Department of Commerce released the file on its effort to recruit a coveted Toyota-Mazda auto manufacturing plant.

The file contains nearly 400 pages of text messages, emails, and other documents that together paint the picture of how economic development leaders sought to woo the car makers to North Carolina.

The North Carolina Supreme Court will hear a case Wednesday over a power struggle between Republican State Superintendent Mark Johnson and the Republican-led State Board of Education. Shortly after Johnson's election in 2016, the General Assembly passed a law to shift powers from the governor-appointed board to the superintendent.

Governor Roy Cooper is urging business leaders to pressure the General Assembly to make funding for education a higher priority.

Governor Roy Cooper is taking a leadership role in North Carolina - and in the country – in addressing the opioid crisis. He was one of six members of President Donald Trump’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis.

Significant court rulings, the latest round of campaign finance reports and policies that might help combat the opioid epidemic were among the political topics that received attention this week.

Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, and Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii about these and other topics in the week's political news.

Elected officials from both parties and at all levels of government are working on curbing the opioid crisis.

In 2017, President Donald Trump seated a commission to make recommendations on the issue, state lawmakers passed a measure changing prescribing guidelines, and municipalities mobilized more first responders to carry an opiate reversal agent.

Judicial musings and off-shore drilling were among the array of North Carolina political topics that received attention this week.

Mitch Kokai, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, review that recent news, and also weigh-in on a piece by the Wall Street Journal exploring an economic divide in the state. Not discussed on this week’s forum – but mentioned – is a piece from the New York Times, noting the wariness of southern lawmakers to pursue divisive social policy, at least for now.


Tensions on the UNC Board of Governors remain high, a month after the board's chairman wrote an op-ed calling for the board to be united.

In the December op-ed, Chairman Louis Bissette called on the board to unite while allowing UNC system leaders to 'do their job.'

Gov. Roy Cooper has vowed to take legal action if the Trump Administration does not exempt North Carolina from offshore oil and gas exploration.

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