voting rights

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Carol Anderson's book "One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy" is an extensive look at voter suppression methods past and present.  She spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb about her book and about suppression efforts taking place in North Carolina.

In July 2013, North Carolina lawmakers passed the Voter Information Verification Act – known more commonly as voter ID.  It’s a controversial law that was ultimately struck down in federal court for being unconstitutional. Nearly four years later, state legislators are now working on another voter ID bill that would be taken to voters as a constitutional amendment, according to sources.

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday struck down North Carolina's 1st and 12th congressional district lines drawn by state legislators in 2011.   A three-judge 

For the second time in a seven-day span, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down an act of North Carolina's General Assembly.

On May 15th, it was the state's voter laws.

On Monday, in a 5-3 decision, the court upheld a ruling that two congressional districts were illegal racial gerrymanders. And this opinion may have implications for other North Carolina cases working their way through the courts.

Updated at 11 a.m., May 22, 2017

State lawmakers were handed their latest legal defeat Monday, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down two of the state's congressional districts because race played too large a role in their creation. Since 2011, more than a dozen Republican-backed bills have been struck down in federal and state courts.

This week in state politics, a conversation about the "raise the age" bill, voter identification, and an audit detailing misuse of funds at the state's largest managed mental care organization.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Western Carolina University political scientist Dr. Chris Cooper is a frequent guest of Blue Ridge Public Radio.  In his most recent visit, Cooper spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb and Matt Bush about the latest in state politics.  The conversation touched on the recently-passed Senate budget, a big Supreme Court punt on voter ID, the brewing (pun intended) legal battle involving craft beer, possible campaign finance mischief, Senator Richard Burr's role in the national spotlight, and some high-profile resignations for the progressive left in North Carolina.  

The Supreme Court will not review North Carolina’s invalidated Voter ID Law, leaving in place a ruling by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals that had struck down the law. A lower court ruled that some provisions in the law "target African Americans with almost surgical precision," and therefore unconstitutional.

A new report from the left-leaning group Democracy North Carolina alleges that former governor Pat McCrory's campaign and the state Republican Party generated "false charges" of voter fraud in last November's election.  In the report released Tuesday, the group says Republicans engaged in a "coordinated legal and publicity crusade to disrupt and potentially corrupt" the election process.

A federal judge late Friday ordered North Carolina to reinstate thousands of voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been covering the case and joined Nick de la Canal for analysis.

A federal judge has ordered North Carolina to reinstate roughly 3,500 voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state.

biography.com

Democratic Georgia Congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis is in Charlotte today trying to rally voters to the polls.  He'll lead a march he says reminds him of marches he lead in Alabama in the 1960s.  Lewis' visit comes as Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton tries to gin up enthusiasm during North Carolina's early voting period, which ends Saturday.  Turnout numbers among black voters are down from where they were this time 4 years ago.  He spoke with WCQS's Jeremy Loeb about those concerns, and about the ongoing legal battle over voting rights in North Carolina.

News & Observer of Raleigh

With early voting wrapping up on Saturday in North Carolina, both presidential campaigns are targeting the state in a big way.  Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will be in the state today:  Donald Trump for rallies in Concord and Selma.  Hillary Clinton in Raleigh.  But the edge goes to Clinton in terms of big-name surrogates.  She’ll be joined onstage today by Senator Bernie Sanders.  Chelsea Clinton is scheduled for a get out the vote rally in Asheville on Saturday.  And yesterday, President Barack Obama tried to push Democrats to the polls in Chapel Hill, acknowledging some of the

A federal judge in Winston-Salem Wednesday said the state's process for handling challenges to a voter's registration "sounds like something that was put together in 1901." Judge Loretta Biggs had pointed questions about the cancellation of nearly 7,000 voter registrations in eight counties over the past two years. The North Carolina NAACP is suing North Carolina, and much of the focus is on recent cancellations in Cumberland and Moore counties. WFAE's Michael Tomsic was in the courtroom and joined Mark Rumsey to discuss.

What stood out?

A federal judge in Winston-Salem will hear arguments Wednesday over the recent cancellations of up to 4,500 voter registrations. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP alleges some of those cancellations targeted African-Americans, and all of them violate federal law. The North Carolina Board of Elections calls that a legal misinterpretation that puts registration policies in most states in jeopardy. Either way, advances in technology have changed the way these cancellations happen.

The state chapter of the NAACP is asking a federal court to stop local elections boards from canceling voter registrations.

The lawsuit says the court should restore thousands of voters who have been removed from the rolls in Moore and Beaufort Counties because of individual challenges.

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, Frank Stasio talks with Jeff Tiberii about the 12-hour meeting held by the State Board of Elections on Thursday.

It was a remarkable meeting that considered and frequently altered the county-level early voting plans that were in dispute. These decisions will play a direct role in how the races for president, governor, senate – anyone on the ballot – plays out this fall.


Robyn Beck/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

North Carolina's status as a battleground state has been reinforced by a number of polls showing a tight race and a slew of campaign visits.  Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Charlotte on Thursday.  The past several weeks also saw visits from vice presidential candidates Tim Kaine and Mike Pence, and even former president Bill Clinton.  But besides a visit to Asheville from Democrat Tim Kaine several weeks ago, western North Carolina has largely been passed over as candidates stump in larger metropolitan areas and the eastern part of the state.  That's about to change

This week, we start off by discussing final early voting plans for 33 counties that couldn't reach their own agreement, including Mecklenburg. Then, what kind of impression did Hillary Clinton leave after her speech at Johnson C. Smith University? 

WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College talks maps and laps with WFAE's Sarah Delia. 

African-American turnout, partisan politics and the threat of more lawsuits were all on the minds of North Carolina Board of Elections members yesterday. They set the final early voting plans for 33 counties that couldn’t reach their own agreement, including Mecklenburg.

Jeff Cravotta / WFAE

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was in Charlotte Thursday for a midday rally at Johnson C. Smith University. She talked about college costs, voting rights, House Bill 2 and her differences with Republican Donald Trump.

The speech was aimed in part at rallying African Americans, and the college vote. There were cheers when she talked about her plans to help both students and historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, like JCSU.

Wednesday, August 31

In this online world, everything is gravitating to the web: banking, shopping, you name it. Then why is it, we’re still waiting in lines to vote?

The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected North Carolina's request to reinstate its voting overhaul this November.

It's not a final ruling in the case. But for this election, it means North Carolina can't use a variety of Republican changes a federal appeals court found were passed with discriminatory intent.

US High Court Refuses to Reinstate NC Voter ID

Aug 31, 2016
wral.com

The U.S. Supreme Court refused Wednesday to reinstate North Carolina's voter identification requirement and keep just 10 days of early in-person voting. The court rejected a request by Gov. Pat McCrory and other state officials to delay a lower court ruling that found the state law was tainted by racial discrimination.

sanford.duke.edu

An exercise to draw North Carolina's congressional boundaries while bypassing political data hopefully will increase interest in "nonpartisan" redistricting and avoid extensive future litigation seen for decades over challenged maps, former state jurists said Monday.

Former state Supreme Court chief justices and other judges from both parties unveiled the districts they drew for North Carolina's 13 seats in the U.S. House using basic population numbers and other guidelines laid out in proposed legislation.

Early voting schedules for the fall elections remain unresolved in at least one-quarter of North Carolina's counties following a federal court ruling that struck down key portions of the state's 2013 voter identification and ballot access law.

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals determined Republican legislators acted with discriminatory intent toward black voters when they approved several provisions, including one that reduced the number of early voting days from a maximum of 17 days to ten.

The North Carolina NAACP, the League of Women Voters and others are asking the U.S. Supreme Court not to reinstate major voting changes in North Carolina. They filed their response Thursday to Governor Pat McCrory's request to put aside an appeals court decision.

Federal courts have struck down voting laws in North Carolina and several other states recently. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has this national roundup.  

On the day that the state of North Carolina asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal’s decision regarding the state's voting law changes, especially voter identification and early voting, Mecklenburg County’s Board of Elections, on a 2-1 partisan vote, voted to cut 238 hours from early voting.

Mecklenburg County's board of elections voted Monday night to cut the total hours of early voting by about 9 percent this year. But the state board of elections will have the final say.

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