voting

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday struck down North Carolina's 1st and 12th congressional district lines drawn by state legislators in 2011.   A three-judge 

Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Federal judges told the North Carolina legislature Tuesday to redraw its own districts by mid-March to replace ones the judges previously struck down and to hold a special election using the new maps in November 2017.

The ruling means those elected to the state House and Senate a few weeks ago would serve just one year, not two as expected.

County boards of election are racing to meet an August 19th deadline to put together new early voting plans.

The 10-day early voting schedule adopted earlier this year had to be scrapped when a federal court struck down North Carolina's 2012 voting law last month.

North Carolina lawmakers are evaluating their next steps in what's now become a five-year battle over the districts we vote in. Thursday, a federal court struck down the 2011 changes to many state House and Senate districts. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Mark Rumsey for analysis of the decision and what comes next.

Once again, a federal court has ruled that North Carolina Republican lawmakers unconstitutionally used race in their decision-making. 

A three-judge panel of the Fourth U.S. Circuit State Court of Appeals has ruled that North Carolina's redistricting map for state house and senate members, redrawn in 2011 by the Republican-led General Assembly, is unconstitutional racial gerrymandering.

WCU

 

With the help of on-campus voting sites, college students in Western North Carolina are disproving the age-old notion that they just don’t vote.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over racial gerrymandering in North Carolina. The justices announced Monday they'll review a lower court ruling that struck down the state's 2011 congressional redistricting plan.

A panel of federal judges heard arguments Tuesday over North Carolina’s controversial voting law at the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

With any general election, there are two aspects that most political analysts will start to evaluate: the composition of the possible electorate (‘who shows up’) and the behavior of that possible electorate (‘how do different groups vote?’).

Granted, North Carolina’s potential electorate can expand between now and November, but an early breakdown of the voter registration pool can give some hint of who is eligible to cast their ballots in the fall.