US Supreme Court

James Doyle NPR

The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination Friday afternoon at 1:30.  A full Senate vote on the nomination is expected as early next week.  Watch the proceeding live below.

James Doyle NPR

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and the woman who has accused him of sexually assaulting her in high school, Christine Blasey Ford, are testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee.  You can watch the proceeding live starting at 10 a.m. Thursday morning.  Blue Ridge Public Radio will also broadcast the proceedings live on both BPR Classic and BPR News Thursday.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set to face a second round of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. He’s expected to be questioned about his views on previous Supreme Court cases, as well as a range of policy issues. Kavanaugh is also likely to be questioned about his work on Ken Starr’s independent counsel investigation of former President Bill Clinton, and his time working in the White House under former President George W. Bush.

The North Carolina plaintiffs fighting House Bill 2 in federal court face more legal uncertainty after Monday's U.S. Supreme Court decision.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Monday morning over the First Amendment rights of sex offenders in North Carolina. The justices will consider a North Carolina law that forbids offenders from accessing Facebook and other social media.

The U.S. Supreme Court has temporarily halted special legislative elections in North Carolina.

A federal three-judge panel ruled last summer that 28 state legislative districts in North Carolina are unconstitutional. That ruling declared the seats illegal racial gerrymanders and ordered state lawmakers to redraw boundaries by March 15th, with special state elections to take place in November.

Aired on Thursday, December 8, 2016

Some of North Carolina's political boundaries have come under scrutiny - this time, before the Supreme Court. We'll look at redistricting and political gerrymandering in the state.

The U.S. Supreme Court is considering the distinction between race and politics in North Carolina's redistricting process. The nation's highest court heard arguments Monday in a case that struck down two of North Carolina's congressional districts. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Mark Rumsey for analysis of the arguments.

Racial gerrymandering in North Carolina will be the focus of arguments today before the U.S. Supreme Court. The short-staffed court is reviewing a lower court ruling that struck down how North Carolina redrew its congressional districts in 2011.

Kara Lynne Wiley / WUNC

US Senator Richard Burr is facing criticism for leaked audio revealing several controversial remarks he gave to a private gathering of supporters.  The tape obtained by CNN caught Burr joking about a gun magazine with Hillary Clinton on the cover and wondering why there wasn’t a bullseye on her.  Burr has apologized for that comment.  But also in the tape, Burr makes this comment regarding the Supreme Court. 

With the presidential election just five weeks away, all discussions about the U.S. Supreme Court focus on the unfilled vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, and the likelihood of more vacancies to come. Speculation about the most likely justice to retire centers on 83-year-old Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. But in an interview with NPR, she didn't sound like a woman eager to retire.

Federal courts have struck down voting laws in North Carolina and several other states recently. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has this national roundup.  

North Carolina passed an abortion law in 2013 with similar language to what the U.S. Supreme Court struck down this week in Texas. But the implementation has been different here.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over racial gerrymandering in North Carolina. The justices announced Monday they'll review a lower court ruling that struck down the state's 2011 congressional redistricting plan.

wral.com

 The Supreme Court has thrown out a North Carolina court ruling that upheld Republican-drawn electoral districts for state and congressional lawmakers.

The justices on Monday ordered the state Supreme Court to consider anew whether the North Carolina legislature relied too heavily on race when it redrew voting districts following the 2010 census.

The high court issued a similar ruling last month involving a complaint from black Alabama Democrats that the Republican-dominated legislature illegally packed black voters into too few voting districts.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images via npr.org

The Supreme Court has passed up an early chance to review a contested North Carolina election law that opponents say limits the ability of African-Americans to cast ballots.

The high court intervened in October to order that the law remain in effect for the fall elections after a lower court ruling blocking part of the law.