Tim Moore

Courtesy of Western Carolina University

North Carolina Republican legislative leaders continue to pass ‘mini-budgets’ as negotiations remain stagnant with Democratic governor Roy Cooper over his veto of their full spending plan.  Without a full budget, construction projects across the state are unfinished or un-started. Here’s a look at one such project. 

 Western Carolina University is heated by its steam plant, which was built almost 100 years ago. The university is currently waiting for $16.5 million in state funds to update it. 

A Washington-based group asked North Carolina ethics officials Monday to investigate some of state House Speaker Tim Moore's business interests and interactions with state environmental regulators over the site of an old poultry plant.

When it comes to drawing districts for congressional elections, House Speaker Tim Moore says North Carolina Republicans nailed it.

“Frankly, it's a model other states could follow,” says Moore. 

UNC System President Margaret Spellings and her community college counterpart shared a stage in Charlotte last night with House Speaker Tim Moore. They fielded questions about how to make higher education more affordable and accessible. 

Pisgah Legal Services CEO on State Cuts to Legal Aid

Aug 14, 2017
Pisgah Legal Services

"They don't have anywhere else to turn."  Pisgah Legal Services executive director Jim Barrett was referring to the roughly 2,000 people that could lose access to their services due to cuts in the state budget.  Pisgah Legal Services is one of three aid groups across the state that will feel the impacts of the cuts.

There could be term limits for the leaders of the state House and Senate under a bill moving through the legislature.

The bill could limit terms for the Speaker of the House and the Senate Leader to four consecutive two-year terms.

House Speaker Tim Moore has given his fellow Republican representatives a bit of homework this weekend.Consider a new plan which would change House Bill 2.

Change, yes, but not a full repeal. WFAE's Nick De La Canal talks with WFAE's Tom Bullock about the proposal.

NDC: Tom, let's  jump right in with the most well-known part of HB 2. Would this plan drop or change the bathroom provisions of the bill?

On this edition of the podcast, North Carolina House Speaker Tim Moore speaks with Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii. Moore (R-Cleveland) is in his 8th term of the House and his 2nd term as speaker. A day earlier in his office, Moore held a news conference to talk about House Bill 2, one year to the day after its passage. The Speaker said the bathroom provision will not be changed under his watch. He also indicated that a proposal to change the bill is being worked on, along with Senate leader Phil Berger, and could be introduced next week.

Senate Republicans rolled out their latest proposal for tax policy changes Thursday morning, days after House Representatives introduced their Tax Reduction Act of 2017.

Speaker Tim Moore and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger are blasting a three-judge panel's granting of a temporary restraining order blocking the senate from proceeding with confirmation hearings on Governor Roy Cooper's cabinet nominees.

In a stunning defeat, the North Carolina House voted down a bill that would have made changes to the Asheville city council.  

Senate Bill 897 was introduced by Republican Senator Tom Apodaca of Henderson County over the strong objection of the entire city council and all other state lawmakers representing Buncombe County.   It would split Asheville into six districts drawn by the General Assembly for the purpose of electing council members.  But the bill failed by a vote of 48-58. 

The Republican majority in the North Carolina House of Representatives was often divided this year. In July, members met for hours behind closed doors and narrowly approved re-organizing the seats on the Greensboro City Council. In September, the 74 members of the Republican caucus were divided and eventually defeated a plan that would have overturned city and county nondiscrimination ordinances across the state. House Speaker Tim Moore said he negotiated with libertarian members of his caucus to approve a plan to offer incentives to companies willing to move to North Carolina. He said he held regular meetings to negotiate other compromises. Yet, in his opinion, divisions were few.

In Their Words: Rep. Chuck McGrady

Apr 28, 2015
The News & Observer of Raleigh

We’ve been talking with area legislators over the past few weeks.  It’s part of an effort to bring you their views, in their words.  Today the focus is on Representative Chuck McGrady, Republican of Henderson County.  On a day when McGrady was preparing for a busy week known as "crossover" - in which most bills have to pass one chamber and "cross over" in order to be considered still alive this session - he took the time to speak with us about issues ranging from taxes, politics, the environment, social issues, and more.  The full conversation is above.  Below are some parts of the intervie

In Their Words: Rep. John Ager

Apr 12, 2015
Katie Bailey/Asheville Citizen-Times

We’ve been conducting interviews with area lawmakers over the past week, as many were home for their version of spring break.  Our conversations continue with Representative John Ager, a Democrat of Buncombe County.  In the segment below, we talked to Ager about recent changes the legislature made to the state gasoline tax, which was immediately cut by a cent and a half, but that initial cut actually prevented the tax from dropping much further -as was projected, because the gas tax is tied to the wholesale price of gasoline.

In Their Words: Rep. Brian Turner

Apr 8, 2015
William Woody/Asheville Citizen-Times

This week, state lawmakers are on their version of spring break, and many local legislators are home.  That gave us an opportunity to sit down and talk about the current session with many of them.  We reached out to members of both parties, and will air excerpts from the interviews in the order they were conducted.  We start today with Representative Brian Turner.  He’s a Democrat representing Buncombe County.  The first-term legislator scored an upset win over Tim Moffitt in November’s election, one among just a few bright spots for Democrats in an otherwise tough election cycle.   

Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images

The North Carolina House speaker says discussions over a "religious freedom" bill will slow to see if the legislation would harm the state's economy, especially in light of criticism over Indiana's new law.

Kings Mountain Republican Tim Moore talked to reporters Tuesday about proposals supporters argue protect the rights of business owners or individuals from carrying out laws they say make it hard to follow their religious beliefs. The issue usually revolves around gay marriage.

Angie Newsome via carolinapublicpress.org

The North Carolina legislature is back in town and ready to work for the year following a two-week break.

The House and Senate planned to reconvene the General Assembly session at midday Wednesday. Little debate was expected on the first day, but lawmakers were expected to file an early flurry of bills. Two chambers elected Republican favorites Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger to their leadership posts on Jan. 14, then went home.

ncleg.net

A former legislator recently reassigned from a post in the state Department of Environment and Natural Resources is returning to the General Assembly, this time on new House Speaker Tim Moore's staff.

Moore announced Friday he's hired Mitch Gillespie of Marion as a senior policy adviser. He's among a dozen people on Moore's staff at the start of his two-year term.

ncleg.net

The North Carolina General Assembly is heading back to work with a new group of 170 legislators for the next two years.

The legislature scheduled its one-day organizational session to begin Wednesday morning.

Republicans who remain in charge of the House and Senate are expected to elect their favorites to run the chambers — Phil Berger of Eden as Senate leader and Tim Moore of Kings Mountain as House speaker. Lawmakers will go home until Jan. 28, when they'll begin in earnest to file bills and debate legislation.