Students

Lilly Knoepp / Blue Ridge Public Radio

The Western Carolina University Faculty Senate narrowly approved a resolution calling for all classes to go online when the fall semester starts next week.  Dr. Yancey Gulley, an associate professor in higher education and student affairs programs at the school, introduced the resolution. 

He says the decision on whether classes should be online or in-person lies with the statewide UNC System.

Photo by Caitlin Penna/Western Carolina University

 

The first day of class for most UNC System schools is August 17. BPR spoke with a Western Carolina University student who already contracted COVID-19 as school officials set out new policies to address the pandemic.

Miranda Curtis is from Murphy. She’s a hospitality and tourism management major at Western Carolina University. Right now she’s rethinking that career path... 

“I mean it seemed like a good major before all of this started,” says Curtis, who is 23-years-old.

Photo courtesy of Western Carolina University

Western Carolina University students will be back on campus this weekend.

 

Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Sam Miller expects about 400 students will move into the residence halls on Saturday. Students have signed up for specific times to remain socially distant.  

 

In total, about 3,500 students will be living in the dorms when classes start on August 17. Miller says this is down from about 4,000 last year for a variety of reasons. 

 

Photo courtesy of Western Carolina University

This week, Western Carolina University Board of Trustees approved increased fees and rates for the 2019-20 academic year. Overall, mandatory fees paid by students will increase by $48 dollars per year or 1.7 percent.

This includes an $8 increase in the health services feel, $14 increase in the student activity fee and a $26 per year increase in the university’s athletics fee as well as other increases.

Koch Controversy Resurfaces At WCU Amid New Research

Mar 10, 2017
Quintin Ellison

   Last fall, the conservative Charles Koch Foundation funded a controversial new center at Western Carolina University, to the tune of nearly $2 million.  Opponents are now releasing research they say sheds light on how Koch money influences public education.

The Hinds University Center at Western Carolina University was packed with students and faculty alike, for the screening of the new film “Starving the Beast”. The documentary explores how recent conservative policymaking is influencing public education.   

WCU

 

With the help of on-campus voting sites, college students in Western North Carolina are disproving the age-old notion that they just don’t vote.