senate race

Obama Blasts Sen. Burr Over Leaked Audio

Nov 3, 2016
News & Observer of Raleigh

President Barack Obama was in Chapel Hill yesterday rallying support for Hillary Clinton.  He also was rallying support for Democratic Senate hopeful Deborah Ross and blasted her opponent, Republican Senator Richard Burr for several controversial remarks he made in audio that was leaked to CNN.

Sen. Burr on Tape Making Controversial Remarks

Nov 1, 2016
News & Observer of Raleigh

Republican Senator Richard Burr was caught on tape joking about gun owners putting a “bullseye” on Hillary Clinton.  Senator Burr was addressing a private gathering of supporters in Mooresville.  The tape was posted to YouTube and reported on by CNN.  In it, Burr seemed to joke about violence towards Clinton. 

Kara Lynne Wiley / WUNC

US Senator Richard Burr is facing criticism for leaked audio revealing several controversial remarks he gave to a private gathering of supporters.  The tape obtained by CNN caught Burr joking about a gun magazine with Hillary Clinton on the cover and wondering why there wasn’t a bullseye on her.  Burr has apologized for that comment.  But also in the tape, Burr makes this comment regarding the Supreme Court. 

Incumbent Sen. Richard Burr continued to hold a fundraising lead over Deborah Ross, his Democratic challenger for the U.S. Senate.

Through the third quarter in this election cycle, Burr had total receipts of nearly $11 million, compared to $8.4 million for Ross, though her campaign has been raising money only for about one year and his has raised cash since Jan. 1, 2015.

North Carolina voters will help to determine the balance of power in the United States Senate next month. Republican Incumbent Richard Burr is seeking a third, which he says will be his final. Democrat Deborah Ross has provided a tougher than expected challenge.

Little-known former Democratic state legislator Deborah Ross is counting on public anger over the GOP political takeover of North Carolina to help her upset two-term U.S. Senator Richard Burr, a victory that could also help hand control of the U.S. Senate back to Democrats.  Despite scant name recognition at the start of the election, Ross has pulled even with Burr in the polls in a state that is split almost evenly ideologically.

Democratic US Senate candidate Deborah Ross is locked in a tight battle with Republican incumbent Richard Burr.  The closeness of the race is a surprise to some analysts who predicted Burr would cruise to re-election.  Ross is visiting the Asheville area Tuesday 9/13 at the Enka Library in Candler from 4 to 5.  She spoke with WCQS's Jeremy Loeb Monday by phone on the way to Asheville.  It's the same day her campaign announced if elected Ross plans to hold community roundtables in every region of the state to hear the voices of North Carolina residents.

In 2014, the race between Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis set the record as the most expensive U.S. Senate election in history.

In contrast, the 2016 race between Republican Richard Burr and Democrat Deborah Ross has been a bit of a sleeper. But that seems about to change.

On today’s WUNCPolitics Podcast: If you believe polls, the presidential race is tighter here in North Carolina than it is anywhere in the country. And if you believe in TV ad money, the race for Governor is the most expensive.

A super PAC with ties to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell plans to spend $8.1 million on television ads in the North Carolina Senate race, where Republican incumbent Richard Burr is facing a spirited Democratic challenge.

With a goal of keeping the chamber in GOP hands, the Senate Leadership Fund said Thursday that it's reserving ad time starting Sept. 13 in nearly all of the state's TV markets. A nonprofit arm of the fund previously announced $2.5 million in ads praising Burr for efforts to preserve Medicare.

Republican Sen. Richard Burr drives alone, steering his white 2013 Hyundai sedan to dozens of factory tours and other North Carolina stops. If there's a TV camera or a reporter, he'll talk. If not, he'll move on.

This week, we focus on the race for U.S. Senate in North Carolina. Ads in the race began airing this week.  Incumbent Republican Richard Burr is seen as vulnerable in what is a close race. Democrats have made taking back the Senate a priority. WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College discusses the race.

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The two major-party candidates for U.S. Senate in North Carolina have unveiled their first television ads for the fall election.

Republican incumbent Richard Burr's campaign says a commercial that started airing Tuesday highlights a black pastor who runs a Raleigh center designed to help children from low-income families learn science and math. The campaign says the center uses child-care subsidies — something Burr has worked on in the Senate.

U.S. Senator Richard Burr is one of the big name Republicans not attending their party convention in Cleveland this week. Still, the Senior Senator from North Carolina made a stop in the city on Wednesday to address the state’s delegation. And he made a surprising announcement.

Heading into the general election, I'm analyzing the voter registration pool for North Carolina at the beginning of each month, watching for key trends and development of certain voting groups.

The latest fundraising numbers are in for the campaigns of North Carolina’s top two races.

Those races are for governor and U.S. senator. And in both races, the Democratic challengers are outraising the Republican incumbents in the second quarter.