Pat McCrory

A new political poll from Elon University found that more North Carolina voters support Governor Roy Cooper than not after his first 100 days in office.

A new report from the left-leaning group Democracy North Carolina alleges that former governor Pat McCrory's campaign and the state Republican Party generated "false charges" of voter fraud in last November's election.  In the report released Tuesday, the group says Republicans engaged in a "coordinated legal and publicity crusade to disrupt and potentially corrupt" the election process.

The North Carolina General Assembly is now back from its January break. And during this session, one Mecklenburg County Republican senator says he will introduce a bill to protect former elected officials from angry protesters. But opponents say it would infringe on First Amendment rights.

A three-judge panel in Raleigh will hear arguments Thursday between North Carolina's new Democratic governor and its entrenched Republican legislature over the separation of powers. Governor Roy Cooper is suing lawmakers over a bill they passed in special session after he had won but before he took office. Senate Bill 4 changes the partisan makeup of the State Board of Elections, and gives lawmakers more control over it. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry for analysis.

Office of the Governor

  RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper has taken his oath of office minutes after midnight Sunday to get an early start amid bitter partisan politics.

The Democrat was sworn in as the state's 75th governor nearly a week before his public inauguration ceremony. A small group of family, friends and colleagues joined him.

State Chief Justice Mark Martin administered the oath in the short ceremony not far from where revelers gathered in downtown Raleigh to celebrate the new year.

When it comes to House Bill 2, time can apparently heal some wounds. Three months ago, Charlotte City Council refused an overture from the General Assembly. The deal was that if council repealed the city’s expansion of its non-discrimination ordinance, lawmakers would vote to repeal HB2. Most council members, including LaWana Mayfield, weren't interested.

Governor-elect Roy Cooper says Republican leaders of the North Carolina General Assembly will call a special session Tuesday to repeal House Bill 2. That follows a surprise move from the Charlotte City Council, which Monday morning voted unanimously to repeal its own expansion of the city’s nondiscrimination ordinance. Joining host Nick de la Canal for more on this is WFAE’s David Boraks. 

Charlotte City Council voted unanimously Monday to repeal LGBT protections the city adopted in February. Council members say they've come around to a deal Republican state leaders have been offering to get rid of House Bill 2, which invalidated Charlotte's protections anyway.

State lawmakers will meet today for a special legislative session to consider repealing House Bill 2, the controversial state law that requires people to use the bathroom corresponding to the sex listed on their birth certificate.

Colin Campbell/News & Observer

There were more protests and arrests Friday as lawmakers continued their surprise additional special session to limit the powers of Democratic Governor-elect Roy Cooper.  On party-line votes, both chambers passed SB4, a bill that includes broad election changes.  It was quickly signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory, according to House Speaker Tim Moore.  The legislature also passed HB17, which restricts Cooper's ability to make appointments.

After an acrimonious day that led to protests and arrests, lawmakers are likely to give final approval Friday to bills that would remove executive powers.

On Thursday, hundreds of protesters gathered at the N.C. General Assembly to voice their opposition to these Republican policy proposals and chanted in unison, "Shame! Shame! Shame! Shame! Forward together, not one step back!"


Updated 10 a.m.

In a flurry of filings Wednesday night, state lawmakers put forward more than two dozen bills to be taken up at an additional special session that opened Wednesday afternoon.  It's not clear how many will get hearings and pass the Republican-controlled legislature.  At least some appear aimed at handcuffing incoming Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.  

A wild day at the North Carolina General Assembly began with bipartisan support for a $200 million disaster relief bill and ended with an unscheduled special session, dozens of new bills, and an effort to remove some authority from Democratic Governor-elect Roy Cooper.

In a chaotic scene of political theater, Republicans flexed their legislative muscles and proposed a series of provisions that would remove certain powers from the Executive Branch, including the Secretary of State and Governor. 

State lawmakers will convene in Raleigh Tuesday to deal with disaster relief, but the agenda is open-ended.

Lame duck Republican Governor Pat McCrory called this gathering to deal with disaster relief stemming from Hurricane Matthew and mountain wildfires in western North Carolina, as well as “for the purpose of addressing any other matters the General Assembly elects to consider.”

Gov. Pat McCrory says he'll ask the General Assembly to approve $200 million in emergency funding during the special session that begins Tuesday. The money will help pay for cleanup and recovery after flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew in eastern North Carolina in late September and wildfires in western North Carolina since October.

Durham election officials have been ordered to do a machine recount on more than 90,000 ballots after technical challenges on election night. Late Thursday, the State Board of Elections gave Durham a Monday deadline to complete that recount.

It's looking more likely that Democrat Roy Cooper will become North Carolina's governor. By state law, Republican Governor Pat McCrory has the right to demand a statewide recount, if the margin is less than 10,000 votes. He got ahead of the game and made that demand last week before counties had finalized all votes. But as the tally stands now, McCrory doesn't have that right. The margin has expanded to 10,256 with results from nearly all counties official.

TUESDAY, NOV. 29

An update on the still-unresolved race for North Carolina governor. Votes are being challenged and there's a call for a recount. Then, what's ahead for education with a newly-elected North Carolina schools chief and the search for a new Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory has officially asked for a recount in his re-election race against Attorney General Roy Cooper. The latest tally has him about 6,000 votes behind Roy Cooper as counties sort through complaints and certify election results.  McCrory said in his letter to the state Board of Elections he has "serious concerns of potential voter fraud emerging across the state." But what are the complaints and what is the validity of them?

Republican incumbent Pat McCrory trails Democrat Roy Cooper by more than 6,100 votes in the ongoing race for North Carolina's governor.

In the two weeks since Election Day, McCrory’s campaign has called for all provisional and absentee ballots to be counted, while raising dozens of claims of voter fraud. As more votes have been tabulated, Cooper’s lead has increased.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory has filed for a recount in the close race against Democratic opponent, Roy Cooper, for North Carolina governor.

The votes are still being tallied in North Carolina's governor's race.  Governor Pat McCrory trails Roy Cooper by more than 6,000 votes. McCrory's campaign has disputed results in 52 counties alleging voter fraud. We wanted to ask the McCrory campaign about its complaints, but no one from the campaign responded to WFAE's interview requests. However, North Carolina Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes did and spoke to All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.

Durham County Board of Elections Chairman Bill Brian defended his department against allegations of inaccuracy Tuesday.

A complaint filed by the state Republican Party’s general counsel last Friday accuses the board of “malfeasance” in its tallying of votes on Election Day.

Democrat Roy Cooper is claiming victory in his bid to unseat Governor Pat McCrory, though results aren’t final. If he loses, the governor can trace the defeat in part to Mecklenburg County. Changing voting patterns and his stand on controversial issues, including I-77 tolls, have eroded the former Charlotte mayor’s popularity at home. 

If Roy Cooper holds on to defeat Pat McCrory for North Carolina's governor, it will be in large part because of voters who came out with that race – not the presidential race – as the driving factor.

While Roy Cooper finished election night with more votes, the race for governor is far from over.

With all 2,704 North Carolina precincts reporting, Cooper held a 2,281,851 to 2,276,850 lead over Pat McCrory, a lead of just 5,001 votes or one-tenth of 1 percent.

Cooper Leads Fundraising Race For Governor

Nov 4, 2016

Roy Cooper widened his fundraising lead over Pat McCrory in the third quarter, according to campaign finance disclosures.

During the quarter, Cooper, the Democratic challenger, raised more than $9 million compared with $5.3 million raised by McCrory, the Republican incumbent governor. That widened the fundraising margin this election cycle to $21.8 million for Cooper and $13.9 million for McCrory, as of Sept. 30.

Politicians love to brag about their endorsements. Those statements of support from other candidates, police or labor unions, newspapers, whatever.

On Friday, October 28th, Republican Governor Pat McCrory received an endorsement from a newspaper which, at first blush, sounds great for him. The endorsement starts with this question, “Which candidate would do the most to help our local economy?”

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

The race for governor in North Carolina is nail-bitingly close.  Republican Governor Pat McCrory has been bogged down for the last six months defending House Bill 2, the state's controversial "bathroom bill."  His opponent, Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper wants it repealed.  That position is supported by gay rights groups and they're making it known.  Two leaders of the LGBT movement were in Asheville stumping for Cooper on Thursday and Friday.

Consider for a moment this number, 66,636.

As of October 24, that is the number of political ads aired in North Carolina this election year. And just for state level races, think governor on down.

Now money in politics, that should not surprise you. But these numbers might. "The estimated cost of those ads is about $32 million." That’s Ben Weider from the Center for Public Integrity. The totals reached by poring through data primarily compiled by Kantar Media.

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