NAACP

NC NAACP

Thousands rallied Saturday at an annual social justice march that began 11 years ago in North Carolina and focused this year on protecting voting rights and ending gerrymandering.

Arlene Thomas of Burlington told The News & Observer of Raleigh that she attended the "Moral March on Raleigh" on Saturday despite the rain because the 2016 election turned the formerly apolitical 68-year-old into an activist.

Ben Graumann, Equality NC

Updated Thursday 4pm 

A highly anticipated judiciary committee meeting was held Thursday afternoon.  For nearly 3 hours, Senate and House lawmakers discussed various merit selection proposals as well as new district maps for judges.  Democrats were skeptical of the GOP plans, especially considering the number of maps drawn for legislative and Congressional members that heavily favored Republicans.

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There’s been a big change atop one of North Carolina’s most prominent civil rights organization.  The influential leader of the North Carolina NAACP is stepping down to lead a national effort focused on the rights of the poor.  BPR’s Jeremy Loeb reports on the man stepping up in his place.

Harry Lynch, News & Observer

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that two North Carolina Congressional districts are illegal because race factored too heavily in their drawing.  The 5-3 ruling is the latest in a string of defeats for the Republican-controlled General Assembly.  It comes just weeks after the court declined to hear an appeal of the state's invalidated voter ID law.  The Reverend William Barber II is head of the state NAACP, which helped bring the lawsuit against the districts.  He spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb about the ruling.  

A day after state officials failed to repeal North Carolina's House Bill 2, Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts tells WUNC city officials do not have immediate plans to reinstate the city ordinance that led the General Assembly to pass the law in the first place.

A federal judge late Friday ordered North Carolina to reinstate thousands of voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been covering the case and joined Nick de la Canal for analysis.

A federal judge has ordered North Carolina to reinstate roughly 3,500 voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state.

A federal judge in Winston-Salem will hear arguments Wednesday over the recent cancellations of up to 4,500 voter registrations. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP alleges some of those cancellations targeted African-Americans, and all of them violate federal law. The North Carolina Board of Elections calls that a legal misinterpretation that puts registration policies in most states in jeopardy. Either way, advances in technology have changed the way these cancellations happen.

The state chapter of the NAACP is asking a federal court to stop local elections boards from canceling voter registrations.

The lawsuit says the court should restore thousands of voters who have been removed from the rolls in Moore and Beaufort Counties because of individual challenges.

The crowd at this year’s Mountain Moral Monday may have been smaller than in recent years.  But it was no less enthusiastic.

In between the music and poetry readings was the main attraction – a keynote speech from Reverend Dr. William J Barber II, president of North Carolina’s NAACP.  While he touched on many topics in his more than half hour address, Barber’s call to action, repeated several times, was just four words long.

“We better vote.  Now.”

Flanked by a group of children from the North Carolina Prince Hall Mason Youth Assembly in Raleigh, the president of the state's NAACP spoke poignantly Friday morning about the recent deaths of two black men and five police officers thousands of miles away.

Hope Street Group

With the state’s next Moral Monday gathering scheduled to be held in Sylva this coming Monday, WCQS’s Davin Eldridge spoke with area school teacher and outspoken member of the North Carolina Association of Educators, John DeVille, who will be addressing the current state of public education as an event speaker. DeVille charges that since 2010, the Republican majority has taken a number of steps to dismantle the state’s public school system.

 

The North Carolina NAACP says Harnett County Sheriff's Office targets poor, rural residents. Now, the organization is calling on the U.S. Department of Justice for a thorough investigation.

The DOJ is already looking into the killing of a man by a deputy intending to search a home without a warrant, and the possible mishandling of another murder investigation.

Rev. Barber on Voter ID Trial: 'This is our Selma'

Jan 29, 2016
huffingtonpost.com

The first week of a federal trial over North Carolina's new law requiring photo identification to vote is coming to an end.  The North Carolina NAACP and other groups are challenging the requirement as unconstitutional and discriminatory toward minority and poor voters.  Republican leaders of the General Assembly pushed for passage of the law, claiming it would limit voter fraud and protect the integrity of elections.  For the latest, WCQS's Jeremy Loeb spoke with the leader of the North Carolina NAACP, the Rev.

Chris Seward/News & Observer of Raleigh

Another 10 people opposed to Republican state government policies have been arrested at the North Carolina Legislative Building.

The demonstrators were led away Wednesday in plastic handcuffs by legislative police. General Assembly Police Chief Jeff Weaver says those arrested would be charged with second-degree trespassing. The protesters remained in the building after its posted 5 p.m. closing time.

The demonstrators are associated with the "Moral Monday" movement that's been holding regular rallies against GOP actions since 2013, leading to 1,000 arrests.

The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP wants the state to answer to what it says is a low number of voter registration applications the state has received from public assistance agencies in the last three years.

Chapter leaders and the Forward Together Moral Movement say they plan to visit the Department of Administration on Monday to submit a public records request regarding the records.

Ron Sachs DPA /Landov

 Protesters with the "Moral Monday" movement plan demonstrations at the home-state offices of North Carolina's U.S. senators to protest their opposition to President Obama's nominee to be the nation's next attorney general.

The North Carolina branch of the NAACP says it will hold protests Monday afternoon outside the Raleigh and Charlotte offices of U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis. Protesters will also demonstrate outside the office of U.S. Sen. Richard Burr in Wilmington.

wral.com

Thousands of people converged on North Carolina's capital to call on Republicans leading state government to reverse and repeal laws they say have abridged voting rights and denied Medicaid coverage to more working people.

The state NAACP and more than 100 advocacy groups staged the 9th annual "Moral March on Raleigh" on Saturday. Demonstrators came with a long list of grievances and demands, ranging from raising the minimum wage and the earned income tax credit. Abortion rights and gay rights activists also were represented.

Bob Geary via indyweek.com

North Carolina's NAACP leader has challenged new rules about public assembly in the state Legislative Building as part of protests targeting policies by the GOP-led Legislature.

About 75 people marched to the building with the Rev. William Barber on Wednesday for a demonstration as lawmakers reconvened this year's session.

After prayers and speeches, Barber asked the group to follow him in a lap around the Rotunda between chambers.

Angie Newsome via carolinapublicpress.org

The North Carolina legislature is back in town and ready to work for the year following a two-week break.

The House and Senate planned to reconvene the General Assembly session at midday Wednesday. Little debate was expected on the first day, but lawmakers were expected to file an early flurry of bills. Two chambers elected Republican favorites Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger to their leadership posts on Jan. 14, then went home.

ncleg.net

The North Carolina General Assembly is heading back to work with a new group of 170 legislators for the next two years.

The legislature scheduled its one-day organizational session to begin Wednesday morning.

Republicans who remain in charge of the House and Senate are expected to elect their favorites to run the chambers — Phil Berger of Eden as Senate leader and Tim Moore of Kings Mountain as House speaker. Lawmakers will go home until Jan. 28, when they'll begin in earnest to file bills and debate legislation.