Kira Bursky

Kira Bursky


Kira Bursky certainly didn’t ask for a disruption like the Coronavirus. But as she talks about her latest video project, she sounds almost giddy about the effect of self-isolation.

Bursky said she’s mapping digital projections onto her drawings and turning these hybrids into short YouTube videos. And these represent just some of the new art people in this region say they wouldn’t otherwise be making if not for the time afforded by pandemic.

“One of the coolest things is finally having this freedom to experiment,” the Asheville filmmaker said. “I’ve had time to try new techniques out. And so because of what’s going on right now, it was a very natural thing to finally try it.”

Matt Peiken | BPR News

This isn’t another top-10 list. But in the spirit of looking back on 2019, we’ve cobbled together this sampler platter from among more than 60 stories Blue Ridge Public Radio produced in 2019 about regional artists and arts happenings.

Jeff Haffner

There are 18 short films on Kira Bursky’s YouTube channel, and after each title are short descriptions such as: “psychologically creepy short film,” “artistic teen depression short film” and “surreal and dreamy cult fantasy short film.”

“A common thread that’s in a lot of my work is diving into the mind—mental health, depression, perspective, fantasies,” Bursky said. “I have an obsession and a passion for diving deeper and deeper into the psyche and how we define and interact with reality.”

Bursky is just 23 years old, but the Asheville filmmaker is already on a trajectory to becoming one of America’s most incisive and distinctive auteurs.