immigration

Cass Herrington / BPR News

Organizations that serve the immigrant and Latinx population are being tasked with encouraging their communities to participate in the upcoming 2020 census. The US Census Bureau is turning to these so-called “trusted voices,” in an effort to alleviate fears about how the data will be used. 

Jason Pramas / Creative Commons

The US Supreme Court is expected to hear oral arguments next month in a case that could determine the fate of the nearly 700,000 individuals protected by Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Samantha Calderón-Colón / BPR News

Migrant farmworkers in rural areas face a lot of pressure -- from language barriers, to geographic isolation, to the current political climate surrounding immigration.  Add in the limited access to mental healthcare in rural locales, it puts workers who travel to Western North Carolina for the harvest season in an even tougher position.  

Meherwan Irani

One of Asheville’s best-known chefs is celebrating his first full year since he took the oath to become an American citizen. 

Wikimedia Commons

A 21-year-old Salvadoran woman living in Western North Carolina is fighting an immigration judge’s order for her deportation. 

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

President Trump is speaking from the White House about his administration's push to add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census. Watch his remarks live.  They are expected to start around 5 p.m. Thursday

Lisa Worf / WFAE

On Friday, BPR News aired the story of a young woman living in Western North Carolina who fled violence in El Salvador as a teenager. This week she faces possible deportation.

Cass Herrington / BPR News

As Henderson County government prepares its upcoming fiscal year budget, opponents of the Sheriff’s agreement with federal immigration authorities say their tax dollars are being misused.  

Social service agencies that work with the immigrant population say the 287(g) program with Immigration and Customs Enforcement leads to more crime and is unconstitutional.

Activists shouted chants from the steps of the historic courthouse, minutes before the regular county commissioners meeting.

MoDOT Photos
Creative Commons

 

Last week, the Trump administration outlined a plan to overhaul the country’s immigration system to prioritize applicants with college degrees over those with familial ties. But business leaders in Asheville say they need workers at all skill levels, particularly given the county’s record low unemployment rate.

Noah Fortson / NPR

President Trump is unveiling an immigration plan that would vastly change who's allowed into the United States. The administration's proposal focuses on reducing family-based immigration to the U.S. in favor of employment skill-based immigration. Watch his remarks from the White House Rose Garden live below.  The speech is expected to start at 2:30 p.m.

Government numbers from May show nearly 12,000 minors are in shelters after being apprehended at the country's southern border. That number has grown under President Trump's zero tolerance policy, which aggressively prosecutes more border-crossers and has separated immigrant children from their parents. 

At least five children who were separated from their parents at the U.S. southern border have been placed in foster care in South Carolina. In North Carolina, officials who resettle immigrants say they're not aware of any children currently being housed in the state after being separated from their families at the border. But they say the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy is affecting immigrants already here.

Sarah Alsammak walked across North Carolina State University's campus pointing out various landmarks. One of her favorite places is the tunnel where students draw graffiti art.

She stopped to pose for a photo – which took longer than it might have, if not for students darting between her and a photographer. She hasn't painted anything on the tunnel walls herself, but said she might before she graduates.

Local immigration advocates say there have been more arrests by federal Immigration & Customs Enforcement across Western North Carolina.  Those come after around 15 people were detained last weekend in Buncombe and Henderson Counties.  ICE spokesman Bryan Cox says the agency makes arrests on a daily basis as part of ongoing enforcement activity.  Appearing on The State Of Things Tuesday, Cox says ICE agents target specific individuals who are in the country undocumented and have criminal record

North Carolina is joining a group of 17 states in suing the Trump administration over a new question added to the Census that asks people whether they are U.S. citizens, Attorney General Josh Stein announced Tuesday.

DREAMers, children brought to the United States by their parents and living in the country illegally, are still uncertain about the future of the program that allows them to work and drive, and protects them from deportation.

Updated at 5:50 p.m., September 7, 2017

Fifteen states and the District of Columbia sued Wednesday to block President Donald Trump's plan to end a program protecting young immigrants from deportation — an act Washington state's attorney general called "a dark time for our country."

DACA Recipients Rally In Durham

Sep 6, 2017

A few dozen young immigrants stood at the Central Carolina Bank Plaza in downtown Durham on Tuesday, carrying protest signs and shouting, "Undocumented, Unafraid."

A few hundred people gathered in uptown Charlotte on Tuesday to express their anger and fear over the President’s decision to end DACA. They included DACA recipients and those who want to protect the legal status of these immigrants. Here are some of their voices. 

Elver Barrios: "2013 came and I got my work permit and I went to the DMV and I got my driver's license. I was so happy to have a driver's license in the state of North Carolina and to be able to drive without the fear of being deported. 2016 came and many of our dreams were shattered in November." 

President Trump's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA, brought a range of reactions in North Carolina. Congressional Democrats called it a betrayal and cold-hearted. Republicans applauded, though they disagree on how far to go with a law to replace DACA. Immigrant advocates hope for a compromise to help DACA's so-called "dreamers." 

Updated 4:54 p.m.

North Carolina Senator Thom Tillis is applauding the Trump administration's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA. Tillis said Tuesday morning it should be up to Congress to set a long-term policy on the status of immigrants who arrived as children.

Immigrant groups in North Carolina are mobilizing amid reports that President Donald Trump may end the DACA program, while giving Congress six months to come up with a possible replacement.

May 1st is celebrated around the world as International Workers Day. In Charlotte and around the state, rallies showed support for a particular class of workers - immigrants. About 250 people marched in uptown Charlotte.

For the past few years, Doha Altaki and her husband Majd were without a country to truly call home. They are Syrian refugees and fled their home in 2013 after the war began.

Business leaders in the region's immigrant communities say President Trump's tougher line on immigration is having a chilling effect on businesses and the broader economy. Fear and uncertainty are keeping some shoppers home and threatening to dampen investment in immigrant businesses - one of the fastest growing parts of the economy.

Matt Bush BPR

Over 130 churches, synagogues, and other faith organizations in Western North Carolina are banding together to aid immigrants in the region.

President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program. It's similar to the president's January order that was blocked by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. But this latest order leaves Iraq off the list of barred countries. The White House cites more cooperation with the Iraqi government in vetting people who apply for U.S. visas. The latest order also specifically states that it does not apply to legal permanent U.S. residents or current visa holders.

North Carolina has a choice to make: either import workers, or import food, according to to North Carolina Farm Bureau President Larry Wooten, who led a delegation of farmers and industry insiders to meet with the state's congressional Republicans in Washington last week.

Federal immigration agents have arrested more than 680 people nationwide since last week, including more than 100 in the Carolinas, in the Trump administration's first major crackdown on people in the country illegally.  U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly acknowledged the operations in a statement Monday, saying about three-quarters of those arrested were a threat to public safety.  But local immigration lawyers and immigrants say the new administration is sowing fear by casting a wider net.

North Carolina's attorney general is joining the legal fight over President Trump's executive action on immigration. Josh Stein, a Democrat, says his office will join a brief with about 16 other states arguing the executive action should remain on hold while the case plays out.

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