governor's race

Durham election officials have been ordered to do a machine recount on more than 90,000 ballots after technical challenges on election night. Late Thursday, the State Board of Elections gave Durham a Monday deadline to complete that recount.

It's looking more likely that Democrat Roy Cooper will become North Carolina's governor. By state law, Republican Governor Pat McCrory has the right to demand a statewide recount, if the margin is less than 10,000 votes. He got ahead of the game and made that demand last week before counties had finalized all votes. But as the tally stands now, McCrory doesn't have that right. The margin has expanded to 10,256 with results from nearly all counties official.

TUESDAY, NOV. 29

An update on the still-unresolved race for North Carolina governor. Votes are being challenged and there's a call for a recount. Then, what's ahead for education with a newly-elected North Carolina schools chief and the search for a new Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory has officially asked for a recount in his re-election race against Attorney General Roy Cooper. The latest tally has him about 6,000 votes behind Roy Cooper as counties sort through complaints and certify election results.  McCrory said in his letter to the state Board of Elections he has "serious concerns of potential voter fraud emerging across the state." But what are the complaints and what is the validity of them?

Republican incumbent Pat McCrory trails Democrat Roy Cooper by more than 6,100 votes in the ongoing race for North Carolina's governor.

In the two weeks since Election Day, McCrory’s campaign has called for all provisional and absentee ballots to be counted, while raising dozens of claims of voter fraud. As more votes have been tabulated, Cooper’s lead has increased.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory has filed for a recount in the close race against Democratic opponent, Roy Cooper, for North Carolina governor.

The votes are still being tallied in North Carolina's governor's race.  Governor Pat McCrory trails Roy Cooper by more than 6,000 votes. McCrory's campaign has disputed results in 52 counties alleging voter fraud. We wanted to ask the McCrory campaign about its complaints, but no one from the campaign responded to WFAE's interview requests. However, North Carolina Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes did and spoke to All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.

Durham County Board of Elections Chairman Bill Brian defended his department against allegations of inaccuracy Tuesday.

A complaint filed by the state Republican Party’s general counsel last Friday accuses the board of “malfeasance” in its tallying of votes on Election Day.

Democrat Roy Cooper is claiming victory in his bid to unseat Governor Pat McCrory, though results aren’t final. If he loses, the governor can trace the defeat in part to Mecklenburg County. Changing voting patterns and his stand on controversial issues, including I-77 tolls, have eroded the former Charlotte mayor’s popularity at home. 

If Roy Cooper holds on to defeat Pat McCrory for North Carolina's governor, it will be in large part because of voters who came out with that race – not the presidential race – as the driving factor.

While Roy Cooper finished election night with more votes, the race for governor is far from over.

With all 2,704 North Carolina precincts reporting, Cooper held a 2,281,851 to 2,276,850 lead over Pat McCrory, a lead of just 5,001 votes or one-tenth of 1 percent.

Cooper Leads Fundraising Race For Governor

Nov 4, 2016

Roy Cooper widened his fundraising lead over Pat McCrory in the third quarter, according to campaign finance disclosures.

During the quarter, Cooper, the Democratic challenger, raised more than $9 million compared with $5.3 million raised by McCrory, the Republican incumbent governor. That widened the fundraising margin this election cycle to $21.8 million for Cooper and $13.9 million for McCrory, as of Sept. 30.

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

The race for governor in North Carolina is nail-bitingly close.  Republican Governor Pat McCrory has been bogged down for the last six months defending House Bill 2, the state's controversial "bathroom bill."  His opponent, Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper wants it repealed.  That position is supported by gay rights groups and they're making it known.  Two leaders of the LGBT movement were in Asheville stumping for Cooper on Thursday and Friday.

Economies of scale is a term well known in the business world. It means a way of saving money if you buy in bulk or better use what you already have.

It’s also a factor in politics.

And may be behind all the attention given two campaign messages sent out by conservatives this week about HB 2.

Consider for a moment this number, 66,636.

As of October 24, that is the number of political ads aired in North Carolina this election year. And just for state level races, think governor on down.

Now money in politics, that should not surprise you. But these numbers might. "The estimated cost of those ads is about $32 million." That’s Ben Weider from the Center for Public Integrity. The totals reached by poring through data primarily compiled by Kantar Media.

Based on the heated rhetoric in the North Carolina governor's race, the State Crime Lab is either a broken, corrupt lab that prevents justice, or it's an efficient operation that puts thousands of killers and rapists behind bars. The lab is part of the office of Attorney General Roy Cooper, a Democrat now running for governor.

With early voting set to begin, North Carolina residents got another side-by-side look of Governor Pat McCrory and Attorney General Roy Cooper Tuesday night. The two sparred – along with Libertarian Lon Cecil - over a range of topics in their final scheduled gubernatorial debate.

Tuesday night three men took the stage for the final North Carolina gubernatorial debate of 2016. And while Libertarian candidate Lon Cecil remained rather calm, Republican Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper got down right testy with each other. WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry with a recap and some fact checking.

In North Carolina, liberal groups have outspent conservatives on television, and Roy Cooper has outraised Pat McCrory, according to the most recent campaign finance reports available.

Cooper had raised 47 percent more money from 76 percent more contributions than McCrory through June 30, the most recent date for which campaign finance information is available.

Recap Of McCrory/Cooper Debate

Oct 12, 2016

Political season is in full swing with debates almost every week. Of particular importance to North Carolina it  the gubernatorial debate between incumbent Republican Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper, the state’s attorney general. That debate was Tuesday night and we take a closer look at what was said, the issues discussed, and how this debate might impact the outcome of this close race .

For an hour last night Republican Governor Pat McCrory and Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper attacked each other’s policies, priorities, and political records. The two men vying to be governor met for a debate just four weeks before Election Day. WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry now for a recap.

With his back against the political ropes, Governor Pat McCrory was ready for a fight on Tuesday night. The Republican incumbent looked energized, confident, and threw jabs, hooks and overhand rights at his challenger, Attorney General Roy Cooper.

An anti-toll business group in the Lake Norman area is trying to keep the issue of toll lanes on I-77 alive in the November election by backing candidates who oppose the DOT project. It's a bipartisan list, and it doesn't include Governor Pat McCrory.

Governor Pat McCrory and Democratic challenger Attorney General Roy Cooper visited Wilmington for the Greater Wilmington Business Journal’s Power Breakfast series, where they battled on the topic of House Bill 2, commonly known as the “bathroom bill.”                        

Governor Pat McCrory and his Democratic challenger, Attorney General Roy Cooper visited Wilmington for the Greater Wilmington Business Journal’s Power Breakfast series. Both took questions from the crowd regarding film incentives.

Roy Cooper criticized Governor Pat McCrory for letting tax credits for film productions expire. He says data shows the film incentives were working and that there were benefits beyond those that could be calculated:

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper told a business lunch in Charlotte Tuesday that the laws and policies of Gov. Pat McCrory and Republicans are damaging the state's reputation. Cooper says he'll work with citizens and business leaders to repair it.

Cooper, currently the state’s attorney general, made his pitch for the governor's job at the Hood Hargett Breakfast Club at the Palm Restaurant, where McCrory spoke last week.

Cooper Critical of McCrory in WNC Swing

Sep 18, 2016
Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

North Carolina Gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper paid a visit to western North Carolina on Saturday.  The Democratic Attorney General addressed dozens of Democrats at the Fairview home of state Rep. John Ager in what was billed as a "candidates meet and greet."  WCQS’s Jeremy Loeb was there and has this report.

VIDEO: Roy Cooper Talks Education, HB2 in WNC

Sep 17, 2016
Jeremy Loeb/BPR

NC Gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper paid a visit to Fairview on Saturday.  The Democratic Attorney General addressed dozens of Democrats at the home of state Rep. John Ager in what was billed as a "candidates meet and greet."  He was scheduled to attend a fundraiser later in the day.  

Cooper started his remarks talking about public education.  "People are hungry for leaders who truly believe in public education and will do something about it instead of just talking about it."

As a whole, median household incomes in North Carolina increased at a pace slower than the national average and middle of the pack compared to southern neighbors.

House Bill 2 was on the mind of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton  during a campaign stop Wednesday afternoon at UNC-Greensboro.

"I’m running for the LGBT teenager here in North Carolina, who sees your governor sign a bill legalizing discrimination, and suddenly feels like a second class citizen," Clinton said to applause.

Meanwhile, with this week’s announcement of college championship boycotts from both the NCAA and ACC still fresh, Governor Pat McCrory paid a visit to a group of Charlotte business leaders.

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