dreamers

Jason Pramas / Creative Commons

The US Supreme Court is expected to hear oral arguments next month in a case that could determine the fate of the nearly 700,000 individuals protected by Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

DREAMers, children brought to the United States by their parents and living in the country illegally, are still uncertain about the future of the program that allows them to work and drive, and protects them from deportation.

Republican Sen. Thom Tillis spoke candidly before the National Immigration Forum on Thursday, touting his proposal to offer a potential 15-year path to citizenship to so-called "Dreamers," all while shrugging off criticism of the bill from conservative hard-liners.

"This will probably drive my press guy crazy," Tillis said, "But ... when I die, I'm going to be cremated. On my cremation urn or a little plaque next to it, I want to have two or three things -- husband, father, grandfather, RINO."

Progressive groups in Western North Carolina are pushing back against the Trump administration’s decision to end the DACA program in six months. BPR’s Davin Eldridge has more…

Well over a hundred demonstrators, mostly students, turned out to protest the administration’s decision at Western Carolina University. They made their objections heard next to the college’s so-called Fountain of Wisdom, in the center of campus. The crowds chanted "si se puede".

Immigrant groups in North Carolina are mobilizing amid reports that President Donald Trump may end the DACA program, while giving Congress six months to come up with a possible replacement.