Darin Waters

Matt Bush BPR

The Vance Monument in Pack Square is one of downtown Asheville’s most recognizable landmarks.  It honors Zebulon Vance, North Carolina’s governor during the Civil War and U.S. Senator during the Reconstruction period.  It has stood for over a hundred years.  But following the removal of Confederate flags and statues in Charleston and New Orleans, the discussion over the future of the Vance Monument in Asheville is becoming unavoidable.

Matt Bush WCQS

NPR will be in Asheville on Tuesday February 7th for the latest 'Going There' event.  Weekend All Things Considered host Michel Martin will lead a night of performances and discussion on the topic 'What Happens When Your Hometown Gets Hot?' at the Diana Wortham Theater.  Tickets for the event have sold out but there will be a live stream that night to watch.  You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @NPRMichel and @WCQS using the hashtag #HotHometown.

On the Walls at WCQS: A selection of the Isaiah Rice Photograph Collection, titled "The Way We Were," will be on display at WCQS, starting October 7, 2016. The photos depict Asheville's African-American community from the 1950's to the 1970s. WCQS will host an an opening reception at 5 p.m. on Friday, October 7. The photos will be on display through November at WCQS, located at 73 Broadway. Visitors are welcome Monday through Friday, 9 to 5, except holidays. 

UNC Asheville Archives

A rare collection of photographs taken by Asheville native, the late Isaiah Rice, are being digitized by the University of North Carolina Asheville.  Rice began taking photographs upon his return to Western North Carolina following his service in the U.S. military during World War II.  David Hurand has our story about a man who documented a period marked by segregation and the end of segregation in Asheville.

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