Classical music

BPR

After more than three decades of entertaining and educating listeners, Blue Ridge Public Radio classical music host Chip Kaufmann is retiring.   We've compiled a few highlights of his wonderful career here. 

Courtesy of Asheville Symphony Orchestra


NOTE: BPR Classic is airing the entire hour-long conversation between Darko Butorac, the new music director of the Asheville Symphony Orchestra, and BPR arts & culture producer Matt Peiken. Broadcasts are at 7pm Dec. 28 and 10am Jan. 15.

 

Darko Butorac was a teenager in Seattle when the grunge movement swept the city and American pop culture. But as millions flocked to the music of Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden, Butorac saw classical music as his rebellion.

“Grunge was becoming big and I was like ‘Oh my god I can’t stand this,’” he said. “Put yourself in this situation: You’re coming from socialist-communist Eastern Europe, you move to the Pacific Northwest, and it’s about as far as you can get from Eastern Europe, both geographically and culturally. The transition for me was very difficult, so I didn’t really feel at the moment that I fit in.”

Matt Peiken | BPR News


NOTE: The Blue Ridge Orchestra concert referenced in this story has been rescheduled for 5pm Jan. 13, 2019, in Lipinsky Auditorium, at UNC Asheville.

 

It’s an early December evening, and cellist Franklin Keel is rehearsing with the Blue Ridge Orchestra. He’s the featured soloist in their upcoming program, and he wants to hear this Vivaldi cello concerto in a particular way.

“Ignore the half-rest,” he tells his fellow musicians. “Play quarter, rest, quarter, rest.”

Just from this window, you might see Keel as an exacting musician. In a conversation the following day, he insisted that’s far from the case.

We're grateful that you choose to listen to Blue Ridge Public Radio, and we're saying thank you with some special programming for the holiday. 

Matt Peiken | BPR News

Most people associate the Brevard Music Center with summer classical concerts featuring world-class performers in an open-air auditorium. Away from the spotlight, about 400 teens and twentysomethings come from around the country to spend most of their summer studying classical performance at Brevard Music Center.

“I’m totally illiterate when it comes to pop culture, because my head is in classical music,” said Myles McKnight, an 18-year-old violinist from Hendersonville.

After a season devoted to auditioning six finalists, the Asheville Symphony Orchestra has tapped Darko Butorac as its next music director. Butorac succeeds Daniel Meyer, who departed the orchestra after the end of the most recent season, his 12th in Asheville.

Butorac, 40, began his life in classical music as a cellist, but had his first chance to conduct an orchestra when he was 17. From then on, he knew he wanted a life on the podium.

Dick Kowal knows a lot about music. He can draw you into a special moment of artistry by one of the world’s great orchestras during one of his broadcasts on WCQS Radio or informally connect with a talented local musician who’s about to perform live on Friday @ 2.