Asheville Police Department

Matt Bush / Blue Ridge Public Radio

Asheville city council approved a 3-month budget Thursday, essentially delaying the decision on whether to cut the city’s police department budget and by how much until September.  

Jarret Porter

Three men have been charged for carrying firearms in downtown Asheville on June 21 at a demonstration, according to the Asheville Police Department.  

Matt Bush / Blue Ridge Public Radio

An Asheville police officer faces charges for use of excessive force during an incident earlier this year.  

David Zack, the current police chief of Cheektowaga, New York, will be the next police chief for the city of Asheville.  City manager Debra Campbell made the announcement via e-mail Monday afternoon.

Wikimedia Commons

The victim of a police beating spoke out for the first time this month about the plea deal the former Asheville officer charged for the incident received.  Leaders of the city’s African American community are offering up similar mixed reactions to the settlement in the case involving Chris Hickman. 

Picture of a white police car in an empty parking lot, trees in background.
policecararchives.org

New Asheville police chief Chris Bailey steps into his role in the wake of events that have created distrust in communities of color. In July, the Asheville Police Department apologized for statements on gang activity in the area which were criticized as racial profiling.  

Matt Bush / Blue Ridge Public Radio

More than 400 untested sexual assault kits in the possession of the Asheville police department have been tested at the state crime lab, after state investigators last year determined there were around 15-thousand untested kits in various law enforcement agencies across North Carolina.  

After a national search with input from the community,  Asheville has named Chris Bailey as the city's new Police Chief.  

Asheville Kidnap Claim Unravels: Mom Charged

May 10, 2019
Henderson County Sheriff's Department

Associated Press - A mother's claim that her 7-week-old baby was kidnapped quickly unraveled after her infant was found at the bottom of a 75-foot ravine in Henderson County, law enforcement officials said Friday.

Henderson County Sheriff Lowell Griffin announced that the child's mother, Krista Noelle Madden, 35, has been jailed on a count of attempted first-degree murder.

This week the Asheville Citizen-Times published a study showing Asheville police were disproportionately charging African-Americans with resisting arrest.  The study, which looked at the last five year, found that 35-percent of resisting arrest charges filed by Asheville police were against African-Americans.  The city's black population is only 12-percent.  The study also found a sizable number of those a

Wikicommons

The city of Asheville Monday afternoon formally asked Buncombe County Superior Court to release any additional police body camera footage of the beating of Johnnie Jermaine Rush.  The unarmed black man was beaten by then Asheville police officer Chris Hickman last August as he walking through the parking lot of a closed business on Short Coxe Avenue.  Rush was initially stopped for suspected jaywalking and trespassing, but charges against him were dropped.  Hickman resigned from the force in January, shortly before a criminal investigation into his actions in the Rush beating was opened by

Wikicommons

The Asheville City Council this week approved a $175-million budget for the coming fiscal year which starts on July 1st.  The city police department was seeking an additional $1-million to hire more officers to patrol the downtown area which has seen a spike in crime.

In North Carolina, young black men are  twice as likely to be stopped in their car than white men. In some U.S. cities, including Chicago, the ratio is much higher. 

WCQS

Mountain views, hiking trails an exploding food scene and more breweries per capita than anywhere else in U.S.   It’s easy to see why the Asheville area is spilling over with tourists and newcomers.   The boom is a boost for the economy but often makes for a busier and sometimes more challenging day for police and other first responders whose job it is to care for both tourists and the people who live  here.  WCQS’s Helen Chickering reports.