The State of Things | Blue Ridge Public Radio

M - F Noon - 1PM

The State of Things host Frank Statio
Credit WUNC-FM

WUNC’s flagship program, “The State of Things” covers many diverse issues and topics in North Carolina. Host Frank Stasio talks with authors, musicians, politicians, policymakers and everyday citizens about subjects that matter to North Carolinians. The program can now be heard in Western North Carolina, M - F from noon to 1, thanks to an ongoing partnership between Blue Ridge Public Radio and WUNC, headquartered in Chapel Hill.

The State of Things is a live show that welcomes comments, feedback and questions from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow The State of Things on Facebook or Tumblr.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

Or, join the live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

  

Whether or not women can have both professional success and a family is an ongoing national conversation, spurred by high-profile magazine essays, viral blogs and books like Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In.

  

 As news of the Ebola outbreak that killed more than 1,000 people in West Africa continues, some missionaries from the region return to the United States. Their treatment and quarantine raises questions about American response to the disease.

The Levine Museum of the New South recently unveiled a historic exhibit that spotlights the LGBTQ community of Charlotte. 

    

In the fall of 1941, German troops killed more than 15,000 Jewish residents in a two-day massacre outside the city of Rovno in Ukraine.

George Williams coaches one of the most successful track and field programs in the country. 

He has served as the coach at St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh for 38 years. And this spring, he won his 35th Division II national championship.  

He’s also been a coach and an assistant coach for the U.S. men’s team in three Olympic Games. His runners include former world record holder Michael Johnson and Bershawn “Batman” Jackson.

But such success comes from a long history of leadership. Williams helped integrate his city track team in Miami, and was one of the first to push for integration in Cary's public schools. 

The Expansion Of Video Games

Aug 8, 2014

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show that aired June 4, 2014.

When many people hear the words “video game,” they think of a stereotypical geeky teenage boy. But that image does not represent the true industry.

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show that aired June 6, 2014.

Logan and Casey Valleroy have years of experience playing nine different instruments. The years of musical experience are impressive since they have a combined total of 24 years of life.

Today's show is a rebroadcast of the following:

The Danger Of Toxic Algae To North Carolina: Algae may seem harmless, but toxic algae blooms can be a real problem in water supplies used by people. They can kill wildlife in the water and be dangerous to humans. Host Frank Stasio talkswith Hans Paerl, professor of Marine and Environmental Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City.

Note: This is a rebroadcast from a show that aired November 7, 2013.

Think you’re avoiding the advertisements when you fast forward through using your DVR?

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show that aired June 25, 2014.

Meet Monika Johnson-Hostler

Aug 4, 2014

Note: Today's program is a rebroadcast of a program originally aired on July 14, 2014.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Monika Johnston-Hostler, Executive Director of the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Wake County School Board Member.

  There are more than 20 towns and cities in the United States named Milton—from the 200-person Milton, North Carolina, to the 25,000-person suburb of Boston called Milton, Massachusetts.

  

The General Assembly’s budget proposal is headed to the state House after a late night in the Senate. 

Senators passed the $21 billion spending plan around 1:00 a.m. and then adjourned for the session. But they left some bills on the table, including a plan to clean up Duke Energy’s coal ash ponds and a proposal to overhaul Medicaid.

The Rosebuds Bloom

Aug 1, 2014

    

For more than a decade, Ivan Howard and Kelly Crisp have played together as the musical duo The Rosebuds. The pair’s sentimental grooves endure on their new album, Sand + Silence, as they pay homage to their North Carolina home.

    

North Carolina lawmakers voted last year to end long-term unemployment benefits.

The move meant the state stopped accepting money from the federal government for workers who had been out of a job for 20 weeks or more. Legislators said they made the change in order to start paying down more than $2 billion in jobless benefits the state already owed to the federal government.

  After an extra month of negotiations, state lawmakers have agreed on a budget for the next fiscal year. 

The $21 billion proposal makes compromises between House and Senate leaders on teacher pay and Medicaid spending. But other issues outside of the budget remain. Lawmakers still have to consider a Medicaid reform bill, local sales taxes changes and environmental protection regulations.

  

Tim Anderson grew up in north Raleigh as a gay, sugar-obsessed teenager.

Four decades ago, Richard Nixon became the first United States president to resign. For many historians, the Watergate scandal marked the beginning of the end of Nixon’s tenure. And his departure from the White House marked the beginning of a loss of public trust in government.

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show from Tuesday, March 18, 2014.

Meet Perry Deane Young

Jul 28, 2014

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show from Monday, February 3, 2014.

Journalist and writer Perry Deane Young has covered some of the biggest stories in recent decades. From the civil rights movement to the Vietnam War and from the Moral Majority to Moral Mondays, Young witnessed and documented key moments in American history. Host Frank Stasio talks with the North Carolina native about his life, his experiences and his writing.

    

    

When children are living in poverty, it can have long-term consequences for their health, education and their own economic status. 

But in many cases, their families don’t have access to social services, or know where to get help. 

After years of national success, Katharine Whalen of the Squirrel Nut Zippers and Justin Robinson, formerly of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, are taking a step back and looking for new ways to explore the folk music both have loved for years. 

The two North Carolina musicians are sharing the spotlight as solo artists in Songwriters in the Round at the Carrboro Arts Center next Thursday at 8 p.m.

  

  Public radio gives you news, politics and entertainment. But what about advice that will make you the star of your next social gathering?

Dr. Patrick Sullivan tells us about new research for schizophrenia

    

Scientists have been working for decades to understand the underlying causes of schizophrenia, one of the most common and most debilitating mental disorders. 

    

Lisa Fischer is one of the most in-demand vocalists in the music industry, but she rarely takes center stage.

  

Two different interpretations of the Affordable Care Act have raised questions about whether some states can give out subsidies to help people pay for health insurance. 

The D.C. Circuit Court ruled yesterday that subsidies are illegal in states that did not set up their own insurance exchanges. North Carolina is one of those states. 

  The late 19th century American South was marked by inequality; Jim Crow was the law of the land and racial segregation was both a social norm and a legal requirement.

    

When Beth McKenzie's grandmother passed away, she left behind a hefty nursing home bill and a dilapidated mansion, and it was up to Beth to figure out what to do. But luckily, she had a plan. 

The State Of Iraq

Jul 22, 2014

Islamic militants are slowly gaining more control of Iraq. 

The group known as the Islamic State is asserting its will in the northern part of the country. It has made Mosul its de facto capital, and has driven thousands of Christians out of the city.

But the battle is not just sectarian, it is political.

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