The State of Things | Blue Ridge Public Radio

M - F Noon - 1PM

The State of Things host Frank Statio
Credit WUNC-FM

WUNC’s flagship program, “The State of Things” covers many diverse issues and topics in North Carolina. Host Frank Stasio talks with authors, musicians, politicians, policymakers and everyday citizens about subjects that matter to North Carolinians. The program can now be heard in Western North Carolina, M - F from noon to 1, thanks to an ongoing partnership between Blue Ridge Public Radio and WUNC, headquartered in Chapel Hill.

The State of Things is a live show that welcomes comments, feedback and questions from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow The State of Things on Facebook or Tumblr.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

Or, join the live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

Democratic U.S. Senator Kay Hagan squared off with her Republican challenger, North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis in their first senatorial debate last night.

The race is essentially neck and neck with two months left before midterm elections. Tillis attempted to tie Hagan to an unpopular president, while Hagan tried to associate Tillis with an unpopular legislature. 

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the American Tobacco Historic Campus revitalization in downtown Durham. The businesses and retail stores occupy a space that was once the epicenter of the tobacco industry. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with former American Tobacco employee Richard Clements about the rise, fall and rebirth of the area.

Rodney King gained overnight notoriety when videos surfaced of him being violently beaten by Los Angeles police officers. 

It’s a Hopscotch Hodgepodge!

Aug 29, 2014

This year marks the fifth anniversary of Raleigh’s Hopscotch Music Festival and the event is bigger than ever. 

  When organizations and companies look to garner support for legislative issues, former lawmakers top the list of lobbyists they choose. A new report by the North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research shows former legislators are the most influential voices in the halls of the General Assembly. Host Frank Stasio talks with the study’s author, Paige Worsham, policy analyst for the Center.

  

The percentage of black state legislators in the South that serve in the majority party has declined rapidly in the past 10 years—from 99 percent in 1994 to 4.8 percent today.

    

Lawmakers in North Carolina decided to not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. 

When Kuwaiti artist and graphic designer Mohammad Sharaf gets angry, he creates art.

  

In 2008, the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) union and Smithfield Foods in Tar Heel, NC reached an agreement to end a 16-year fight for better worker conditions. 

  The Asheville nonprofit Just Economics has been pushing for local businesses to pay a living wage. 

  

The Affordable Care Act creates new policies to keep healthcare costs down. As revenue streams shift, healthcare systems look for new ways to make money.

Last year, it looked unclear if Keilia Scott would be able to complete the cosmetology program she began at Wake Tech Community College in Raleigh. A foster child since the age of 15, Scott struggled in her teen years without family support.

She moved to nine different homes and each transition meant adaptation to a new family, new rules and a new school. Scott admits she was rebellious and ran away from several homes. The system eventually  placed her in a locked facility out-of-state.

    

  The Durham Police Department has been accused of racial profiling, which led the Human Relations Commission to recommend changes in policy and procedure in May.

Atlanta is considered the Black Gay Mecca of the United States.

  

The Southern Folklife Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill  has grown to contain more than half a million items, including sound recordings, moving images, photographs, posters and ephemera.

When you were a child, did you imagine being Superman? 

 People rarely associate gay and lesbian films with the science fiction genre. But a Durham-based production company, KVWorks, created a sci-fi lesbian web series. 

  The human body is one of the oldest art forms. But its exposure still raises controversy in modern society. A new exhibit by Durham-based photographer Dan Smith looks at issues around nude art from a range of perspectives: dancers, models, photographer and academics. The project, Bare: Conversations on Human Art Photographs and oral histories on the Nude is on exhibit at the Carrack Art Museum in Durham through August 23. Host Frank Stasio talks with Smith about the project.

  

When the textile mill closed in Kannapolis, NC in 2003, more than 4,000 workers lost their jobs. The effects on the small community outside of Charlotte were devastating.

    

A new report from the Brookings Institution ranks four North Carolina cities among the top 15 in the country where poverty is soaring fastest: Raleigh, Charlotte, Winston-Salem and Greensboro-High Point. 

  

Triad poets are gaining local and national recognition for their creative approaches to poetry and poetry-inspired community work. 

    

Musician Laila Nur developed her “revolutionary love” music style when she moved alone to Greensboro at 19. 

  

Stories shape how we think about ourselves and the world around us, and insights from science, history, and biology confirm that humans are storytelling animals. 

  

Soul was a mainstay in the Durham music scene during the 1960s and 70s.

Durhamites were dancing to songs like "Bull City Party" in 1977. It’s one of many songs that show Durham’s soul music had strong ties to the city, and built lasting connections within the African-American community. 

  

Stand-up comedy acts can be a routine collection of one-liner and insults. 

  

North Carolina has a drug overdose rate that is higher than average. 

  

North Carolina has a rich history of producing furniture. High Point has been at the center of the market for more than a century. 

But the industry looks much different than it did just a few decades ago. Globalization caused many companies to send manufacturing overseas. Most recently, Stanley Furniture Company closed its plant in Robbinsville.

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