Sunday Puzzle: Lost ID's

Jun 7, 2020
Originally published on June 11, 2020 11:45 am

On-air challenge: The theme of today's puzzle is "Lost ID's." I'm going to give you clues for two words. The first word has the consecutive letters I-D somewhere in it. Drop the I-D and what's left will spell a new word that answers the second clue.

Example: Opposite of narrowest / Direction for sunsets --> Widest, west
1. End of the workweek / Disorderly fight
2. Box for cigars / Jokes and such
3. Partition / One jumping in a pool
4. Mints that are said to be "curiously strong" / Voices below sopranos
5. Mishap on the highway / Stress
6. Chief executive / Gift
7. Capital of Rhode Island / Southeastern France
8. Frighten or overawe / Very close, as a friend

Last week's challenge: This challenge came from listener Scott Weiss, of Walkersville, Md. Think of a familiar three-word name of something. The first word in that name is a number. Let's call that number "x." The last "x" letters of the second word of the name are a French translation of the third word. What's the name?

Challenge answers: Three Mile Island

Winner: Anita Charles of Auburn, Maine.

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Chad Graham, of St. Louis. Name a well-known restaurant chain. Rearrange its letters to name a large area in the United States. This area has a two-word name. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, June 11th, at 3 p.m. ET.

Correction: 6/11/20

A previous version of the Sunday Puzzle incorrectly stated that Anita Charles is from Auburn, Fla. Charles is from Auburn, Maine.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He is puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's very own puzzlemaster.

Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: What was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah. It came from listener Scott Weiss of Walkersville, Md. I said, think of a familiar three-word name of something. The first word in that name is a number. Let's call that number X. The last X letters of the second word of the name are a French translation of the third word. What's the name? And the name is Three Mile Island - starts with three. The last three letters of mile are I-L-E, and that's French for island, which is the third word.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received just over 200 correct responses, so a tough one this week. And the winner is Anita Charles from Auburn, Maine.

Congratulations.

ANITA CHARLES: Thank you. Thank you so much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How did you figure out this week's answer?

CHARLES: Well, it was quite serendipitous. I was traveling a bit of a distance and was in my car listening to the program, and I heard The Puzzle. So I started to just brainstorm some phrases - three-legged race, four-sided figure. And in that moment, literally within a couple of minutes, I looked up, and my GPS - to find out when my next turn would be - and my GPS said 3 MI. And I read it as three mile. And I instantly - my brain said Three Mile Island. So I guess you could say that my GPS gave me the answer.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I like that story. How long have you been playing The Puzzle?

CHARLES: I listen off and on. I have for years, but I have never submitted a response before.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oh, I like it.

CHARLES: Yeah.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: This is great. I'm glad that this is your first time. All right. Are you ready to play?

CHARLES: I am ready.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) OK. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right, Anita. The theme of today's puzzle is lost IDs. I'm going to give you clues for two words. The first word has the consecutive letters I-D somewhere in it. Drop the idea and what's left will spell a new word that answers the second clue. For example, if I said opposite of narrowest and direction for sunsets, you would say widest and west.

CHARLES: OK.

SHORTZ: Here's number one - end of the workweek and a disorderly fight. End of the workweek has ID somewhere in it.

CHARLES: OK. Friday and fray.

SHORTZ: You got it. And I know that's not true for you, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) It's not.

SHORTZ: Friday's mid-week for you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It is.

SHORTZ: But for most people...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It is.

SHORTZ: For most people. Here's your next one - a box for cigars and jokes and such.

CHARLES: Jokes and such.

SHORTZ: That's in five letters - comedy, whatever makes you laugh.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And the box for cigars - you keep them moist.

CHARLES: Yeah. Humidor - is that it?

SHORTZ: That's it. That's it.

CHARLES: And humor.

SHORTZ: Humidor and humor - good. Partition and one jumping in a pool.

CHARLES: Oh, divider and diver.

SHORTZ: Diver is good. Mints that are said to be curiously strong and voices below sopranos.

CHARLES: Altoids and alto.

SHORTZ: That's it. Here's your next one - mishap on the highway and stress.

CHARLES: Accident and accent.

SHORTZ: That's it. A chief executive and a gift.

CHARLES: President and present.

SHORTZ: Nice. The capital of Rhode Island and southeastern France.

CHARLES: OK. Let's see. France - capital of Rhode Island is Providence and Provence.

SHORTZ: Provence - good. And here's your last one - to frighten or overawe. And the second clue is very close, as a friend. And let's say you don't want someone to do something. You frighten them. You overawe them. You blank them - starts with an I.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: People say I can be like this sometimes.

CHARLES: Intimidate.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

CHARLES: Intimidate. OK. So intimate.

SHORTZ: Intimate - good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job. You did great. How do you feel?

CHARLES: I feel great. Thank you very much. That was fun.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did a really, really good job. And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Anita, which member station do you listen to?

CHARLES: I listen to WMEA out of Portland, Maine.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Anita Charles of Auburn, Maine, thank you so much for playing The Puzzle and enjoy your summer.

CHARLES: Thank you very much. You, too.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will. What's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah. It comes from listener Chad Graham of St. Louis. Name a well-known restaurant chain. Rearrange its letters to name a large area in the United States. And this area has a two-word name. What is it? So again, a well-known restaurant chain. It's seen all across the country. Rearrange its letters to name a large area in the United States with a two-word name. What area is it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, June 11, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's very own puzzlemaster Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.