Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Updated at 12:02 p.m. ET

Hong Kong police cracked down on pro-democracy protesters demonstrating Tuesday at Hong Kong International Airport after they caused serious flight disruptions for a second day at one of the world's busiest aviation hubs.

Television footage showed tense confrontations late Tuesday between protesters wearing masks and local police. Protesters appeared to be barricading themselves inside a terminal using luggage carts as police tried to get them to leave.

Updated at 6 a.m. ET

Hundreds of protesters in Hong Kong waved banners and passed out anti-government leaflets to passengers arriving at the city's airport, as they sought to bring international attention to their campaign for greater freedom in the Chinese territory.

"Dear travelers," some of the flyers read in English, "Please forgive us for the 'unexpected' Hong Kong. You've arrived in a broken, torn-apart city, not the one you have once pictured. Yet for this Hong Kong, we fight."

A typhoon with sustained top winds of 130 mph is churning at sea as it heads for a landfall on China's eastern coast Saturday, expected to bring heavy rain and flooding.

Beijing on Friday issued its highest warning for super typhoon Lekima, which is expected to come ashore near the city of Ningbo in Zhejiang province in the pre-dawn hours of Saturday.

A day after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers arrested nearly 700 people in sweeping raids at several food-processing plants in Mississippi, officials said Thursday that nearly half of those detained had already been released.

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Kyrgyz police detained former President Almazbek Atambayev on Thursday after an earlier arrest attempt in which security forces were forced back by a hail of bullets from political supporters barricaded inside his rural home near the capital, Bishkek.

Japan's foreign ministry is cautioning its citizens residing in the United States to be alert to "the potential for gunfire incidents" after a spate of mass shootings in recent days.

The concern came as at least two other nations – Uruguay and Venezuela — issued travel warnings for the U.S. in the wake of shootings in Gilroy, Calif.; Dayton, Ohio; and El Paso, Texas, in which a total of nearly three dozen people were killed.

Updated at 9:35 a.m. ET

Pakistan's prime minister warned that a move by India to strip Kashmir of its special status could lead to war between the two countries and the "ethnic cleansing" of Muslims in the restive Himalayan region.

Imran Khan cited a suicide attack in February that killed at least 40 Indian security forces in Indian-controlled Kashmir and was followed by airstrikes and a dogfight between Indian and Pakistani pilots.

Amid weeks of mass anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong that have frequently turned violent, Beijing on Tuesday issued a stark warning to protesters: "those who play with fire will perish by it."

The remarks, at a news conference in Beijing, were made by Yang Guang, a spokesman for the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office of the State Council.

He said China has "tremendous power" to put down the protests and warned that anyone who engages in "violence and crimes ... will be held accountable."

A consortium of scientists hoping to build the world's largest optical telescope on Hawaii's tallest peak has applied to site it instead in the Canary Islands amid ongoing protests by Native Hawaiians who oppose construction of the instrument on what they consider a sacred volcano.

Astronomers say the Thirty Meter Telescope, or TMT, will have a dozen times the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope. For weeks, protesters have delayed the start of construction on the Big Island's Mauna Kea volcano.

Nuon Chea, who served as Pol Pot's chief lieutenant during Cambodia's murderous Khmer Rouge regime in the 1970s, has died at 93, according to a U.N. tribunal which found him guilty last year of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Iran says it has seized an Iraqi oil tanker in the Persian Gulf, including seven crew members, for allegedly smuggling fuel. It is the third such incident in just two weeks amid rising tensions in the strategic waterway.

The country's state news agency IRNA quoted Iran's Revolutionary Guard as saying the ship was seized near Farsi Island last Wednesday and was found to be illegally transporting 700,000 liters (185,000 gallons) of diesel. Iran's Fars news agency said the ship was taken to Bushehr Port in southwestern Iran and that its fuel had been turned over to authorities.

India's government on Monday took the extraordinary step of revoking Kashmir's constitutionally guaranteed special status, a move that would tighten its control over the country's only Muslim-majority state.

In a decree issued by President Ram Nath Kovind, Article 370 of India's Constitution was rescinded amid protests and criticism of the move, which would turn the state into a union territory.

North Korea has reportedly conducted a third test launch in just over a week, firing what appeared to be short-range ballistic missiles, according to South Korean officials.

The presidential office in Seoul said the South Korean and U.S. militaries believe the test involved short-range ballistic missiles. South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff noted that they flew about 137 miles and reached an altitude of 15 miles, traveling at the hypersonic speed of Mach 6.9.

Women in Saudi Arabia will be allowed to obtain passports and travel abroad without a male "guardian" to accompany them, according to a change in the law published on Friday that ends a long-standing practice in the kingdom that has drawn international criticism.

The change in the law allows women over the age of 21 to apply for a passport without a male sponsor and to leave Saudi Arabia unaccompanied. It was not immediately clear when the change would take effect.

Boris Johnson, Britain's new prime minister, saw his parliamentary majority reduced to a single vote on Friday after his governing Conservative Party lost a special election just as it faces a tough fight over Brexit.

The Tories were defeated by the opposition Liberal Democrats in a contest for the seat of Brecon and Radnorshire in Wales. Jane Dodds won 43% of the vote to 39% for Conservative Chris Davies, who was battling to retain his seat after being convicted of expenses fraud.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani lashed out at new U.S. sanctions imposed on the country's foreign minister, calling the Trump administration move "childish."

On Wednesday, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced sanctions on Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, blocking him from doing business with Americans and restricting his access to any property he might have in U.S. jurisdictions. The move is seen as part of the administration's ratcheting up of pressure on Iran amid increased tensions between the two countries.

North Korea says that a test-firing it conducted this week was of a battlefield weapon new to its arsenal, contradicting a South Korean assessment that the launch on Wednesday was of a pair of previously known short-range ballistic missiles.

The official Korean Central News Agency said that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un expressed satisfaction after overseeing the successful test of "a newly developed large-caliber multiple launch guided rocket system on July 31."

Military awards given to prosecutors in a case against a SEAL who was acquitted of murder in the death of a prisoner in Iraq have been revoked by the Navy's top official after President Trump tweeted Wednesday that the commendations should be withdrawn.

Navy Secretary Richard Spencer ordered seven Navy Achievement Medals and three letters of commendation given to the prosecution team be rescinded, Navy spokesman Cmdr. Jereal Dorsey said Wednesday, hours after a pair of scathing tweets from the president.

Princess Haya bint al-Hussein of Jordan, one of six wives of the ruler of Dubai, has asked a U.K. court for protection after she fled the United Arab Emirates earlier this year with her two children.

A week after similar tests, North Korea has again fired two short-range missiles into the waters that separate it from Japan, according to South Korea's military.

South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff announced that the missiles, which flew about 155 miles and reached an altitude of 18 miles, were launched about 20 minutes apart early Wednesday morning from the Kalma area near North Korea's Wonsan port, according to the Yonhap news agency.

A woman has been charged in connection with a hacking breach at Capital One bank that exposed information from more than 100 million credit applications over a 14-year period – what is thought to be one of the largest such attacks in recent years.

Authorities in Seattle have charged Paige A. Thompson, who also goes by the handle "erratic," with a single count of computer fraud. She appeared in court on Monday and is scheduled for a detention hearing on Thursday.

At least 57 prisoners were killed by fellow inmates during a prison riot in northern Brazil in what authorities have described as a "targeted act" by gang members directed at a rival group.

The riot at Altamira prison began early Monday and lasted throughout the morning, according to authorities. Two prison officials were reportedly taken hostage, but later released after negotiations.

Authorities in Sweden have charged rapper A$AP Rocky with assault in connection with an altercation last month in Stockholm — a case that has rallied celebrities such as Kim Kardashian and Justin Bieber and even a personal intervention from President Trump.

The musician and record producer, whose real name is Rakim Mayers, was detained along with two others by police following a street brawl in the Swedish capital, where the rapper was on tour.

North Korea has fired two short-range missiles into the Sea of Japan, the first such test since a high-profile meeting last month between President Trump and Kim Jong Un.

Updated at 5:35 a.m. ET

An Arkansas federal judge has temporarily blocked three new abortion restrictions, including a requirement that physicians providing the procedure be board-certified — a move that would likely have caused the closure of the state's only surgical abortion clinic.

Cambodia's prime minister has denounced as "fake news" a report in The Wall Street Journal that his country had signed a secret deal to allow Chinese warships to use a naval base in the Gulf of Thailand.

"This is the worst-ever made up news against Cambodia," Hun Sen told the country's pro-government Fresh News on Monday, according to The South China Morning Post.

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET

Yukiya Amano, the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, has died at age 72, leaving a vacancy at the top of the monitoring body just as tensions over Iran's nuclear ambitions appear to be reaching a critical threshold.

The former Japanese diplomat had led the United Nations' nuclear watchdog since 2009. He was integral to the negotiations leading up to the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA. The U.S. unilaterally withdrew from the agreement last year.

Exit polls in Ukraine indicate that the party of the country's comedian-turned-president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, has won a snap election aimed at strengthening its coalition only months after coming to power.

Zelensky's Servant of the People party is expected to garner about 41 percent of the vote and gain a majority in parliament, but it will not have enough seats to govern without allies, according to the polls released Sunday.

The Apollo program conjures images of Neil Armstrong's first steps on the moon and the massive team effort involved in getting him there. But a fundamental decision that led to the successful lunar landings came largely as a result of one man's determination to buck the system at NASA.

That man was John C. Houbolt.

In the summer of 1962, Walter Schirra — who would soon become America's third man to orbit the Earth — walked into a Houston photo supply shop looking for a camera he could take into space.

He came out with a Hasselblad 500C, a high-end Swedish import that had been recommended to him by photographers from Life and National Geographic.

Pages