Michael Tomsic

Michael Tomsic became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Heââ

Federal health leaders are promoting a form of contraception that's effective for years and essentially forget-proof.

They're encouraging state Medicaid programs to increase access to intrauterine devices and arm implants, both of which are more effective than the birth control pill. South Carolina as a whole and one North Carolina county are ahead of the curve on this.

The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected North Carolina's request to reinstate its voting overhaul this November.

It's not a final ruling in the case. But for this election, it means North Carolina can't use a variety of Republican changes a federal appeals court found were passed with discriminatory intent.

The Obama administration is touting a new argument for why states like North Carolina should expand Medicaid. Federal researchers found in states that already have, the premiums people pay on the Obamacare exchanges are lower.

The North Carolina NAACP, the League of Women Voters and others are asking the U.S. Supreme Court not to reinstate major voting changes in North Carolina. They filed their response Thursday to Governor Pat McCrory's request to put aside an appeals court decision.

Charlotte City Council members approved new body armor and more community training for CMPD last night. They also got updates on the streetcar, the airport and the NBA All-Star game. We’ll get to those in a minute. But first, the votes involving CMPD and the frustration many at the meeting expressed about police treatment of African-Americans.

Federal courts have struck down voting laws in North Carolina and several other states recently. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has this national roundup.  

Mecklenburg County's board of elections voted Monday night to cut the total hours of early voting by about 9 percent this year. But the state board of elections will have the final say.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate North Carolina's voting overhaul. He’s requesting an appeals court decision be put on hold through November.

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals struck down the election changes last month, ruling that GOP lawmakers passed them with discriminatory intent.

Some well owners near coal plants say the resignation of North Carolina’s epidemiologist confirms what they’ve been saying for months: their water is not safe to drink.

North Carolina lawmakers are evaluating their next steps in what's now become a five-year battle over the districts we vote in. Thursday, a federal court struck down the 2011 changes to many state House and Senate districts. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Mark Rumsey for analysis of the decision and what comes next.

You normally don’t hear much about North Carolina’s state epidemiologist.

But it’s not every day that a scientist sends out a scathing letter of resignation.

That’s just what Dr. Megan Davies did late Tuesday night, citing what she sees as McCory administration officials misleading the public about whether or not well water near unlined coal ash ponds is safe to drink. 

In federal court in Winston-Salem on Monday, the U.S. Justice Department and the state of North Carolina square off in an early round of arguments over House bill 2. The Justice Department says part of the controversial law discriminates against LGBT people.

House bill 2 made a variety of changes impacting the LGBT community. This case is focused on the part that requires transgender people to use the bathroom corresponding to their birth certificate in schools and government buildings.

Judges one step below the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday the major parts of North Carolina's 2013 election overhaul are unconstitutional. The federal appeals court ruled that Republican state lawmakers restricted voting and registration in five different ways, all of which disproportionately affected African-Americans. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been covering this case for three years and joined Mark Rumsey to discuss.

A federal appeals court has struck down major parts of North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul. The three-judge panel ruled unanimously Friday the state's Republican lawmakers passed the 2013 changes with discriminatory intent.

In the court fight over North Carolina's controversial law concerning LGBT people, nearly 70 companies are weighing in on the side of the U.S. Justice Department. A federal judge granted their motion Tuesday to file a friend-of-the-court brief.

All 13 of North Carolina's representatives in the U.S. House voted in favor of an overhaul of the country's mental health system Wednesday. The bill gained momentum this year in part because of mass shootings.

North Carolina passed an abortion law in 2013 with similar language to what the U.S. Supreme Court struck down this week in Texas. But the implementation has been different here.

Governor Pat McCrory is calling for a total review of the U.S. National Whitewater Center's oversight after preliminary tests found a microorganism that may be linked to a woman's death. McCrory made the comments to the Charlotte Observer on Monday. But Mecklenburg County's health director doesn't know if better regulation would help in this case.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over racial gerrymandering in North Carolina. The justices announced Monday they'll review a lower court ruling that struck down the state's 2011 congressional redistricting plan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have detected the presence of a microorganism at the U.S. National Whitewater Center that may be linked to a woman's death. The Whitewater Center is closing its whitewater channel after the preliminary tests, which found evidence of what's best known as the brain-eating ameba.

Epidemiologists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are testing for a microscopic organism at the U.S. National Whitewater Center. That's after a young woman died recently from a rare infection caused by that organism.

The legal fight over North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul played out one step below the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The U.S. Justice Department, the North Carolina NAACP and others tried to convince the federal appeals court in Virginia that the 2013 law is discriminatory.

Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill into law Monday to address one aspect of the opioid epidemic. The bipartisan legislation makes an overdose reversal drug much easier to get.

Attorneys for the U.S. Justice Department and North Carolina square off Tuesday before the federal appeals court in Virginia. The Justice Department, the League of Women Voters and others are appealing a judge's decision that upheld North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul.

Nearly two years after a 17-year-old African-American was found dead, hanging from a swing set in eastern North Carolina, the U.S. Justice Department announced Thursday it will not pursue criminal charges.

North Carolina is overhauling its Medicaid program to try to hold down costs while improving care. Health leaders submitted the plan to the federal government recently after adjusting it based on public feedback.

The Obamacare exchange in North Carolina will experience some turnover among insurance companies next year. It'll likely result in three companies still taking part but only one or two in most counties.

The Charlotte Chamber reports the number of businesses interested in Mecklenburg County has declined substantially. The reason? North Carolina’s controversial law affecting LGBT people. The Chamber is trying to increase pressure on state lawmakers and city council members to make changes.

There's a recent precedent for the fight in North Carolina over a controversial law that limits rights for the LGBT community. Last year in Indiana, Republican lawmakers passed a bill allowing businesses to use religion as a defense in refusing to serve gay and lesbian customers. But after a swift national outcry, Indiana walked back the law. In North Carolina, the outcry has been similar but the state's response is completely different.

The U.S. Justice Department has determined North Carolina’s House Bill 2 violates the Federal Civil Rights Act by discriminating against transgender individuals. It’s given the state until close of business Monday to confirm "the state will not comply with or implement House Bill 2."

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