Jeff Tiberii

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (ME) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now WUNC, dates back 15 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Marketplace , Here & Now and the BBC. He has been recognized with seven regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, dozens of other honors, and has twice been named radio reporter of the year in the Carolinas. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

 

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Evangelist Billy Graham, the North Carolina icon known as “America’s Pastor” who conducted more than 400 crusades and whose sermons were heard by an estimated two billion people, died Wednesday. He was 99.

There was another mass shooting in the United States this week. That means another round of emotional reactions, social media sparring and carefully delivered messages by elected officials. If recent shootings serve as any example, it's also likely that no legislative action will follow.

State legislators have departed for an extended break, but unsurprisingly, the partisan spats are not quieting down.

This week in North Carolina politics saw disputes over the constitutionality and possible ethical issue stemming from a $57.8 million mitigation fund related to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

State legislators have adjourned until May after voting to fix a long-standing issue over mandated class sizes, while delaying further action on the GenX water contamination issue.

It was a hectic week in downtown Raleigh, where lawmakers sparred with Governor Roy Cooper, debated the components of a multifaceted bill, and closed in on the 2018 election, which begins Monday with candidate filings.

Lauren Horsch, a reporter with the NC Insider, reviews the week with WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and notes her favorite winter Olympic sport.

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a class size bill, and North Carolina’s redistricting saga are among the issues in the news this week in state politics. Also, how open is North Carolina state’s  government and how accessible is it for journalists and the public to access what happens at the General Assembly?

Four candidates for the North Carolina Senate kick off their campaigns today. They are all Democrats challenging Republican incumbents and they are all white women, none of whom have ever held elected office.

Governor Roy Cooper is taking a leadership role in North Carolina - and in the country – in addressing the opioid crisis. He was one of six members of President Donald Trump’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis.

Significant court rulings, the latest round of campaign finance reports and policies that might help combat the opioid epidemic were among the political topics that received attention this week.

Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, and Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii about these and other topics in the week's political news.

Elected officials from both parties and at all levels of government are working on curbing the opioid crisis.

In 2017, President Donald Trump seated a commission to make recommendations on the issue, state lawmakers passed a measure changing prescribing guidelines, and municipalities mobilized more first responders to carry an opiate reversal agent.

Judicial musings and off-shore drilling were among the array of North Carolina political topics that received attention this week.

Mitch Kokai, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, review that recent news, and also weigh-in on a piece by the Wall Street Journal exploring an economic divide in the state. Not discussed on this week’s forum – but mentioned – is a piece from the New York Times, noting the wariness of southern lawmakers to pursue divisive social policy, at least for now.


It appears that judicial redistricting is again stalled in the North Carolina General Assembly. That comes after a recent show of confidence from leading state Republicans that the issue might pick up momentum.

Thanks to winter weather, it was a slow work week for many in North Carolina. However, the political world trudged along with more redistricting and judicial developments.

A committee of U.S. Senators has again approved a controversial pick for the Federal Bench. Thomas Farr is up for a life-time position in the Eastern District of North Carolina. He has been criticized for his work as an attorney defending recent voting laws passed by the Republican-led General Assembly – and also for his work on a Jesse Helms campaign in 1990.

On this week's review of North Carolina politics, lawmakers again discussed what to do about GenX, the contaminant that has been discharged in the Cape Fear River. Also, lawmakers return to Raleigh next week, though their agenda remains unclear. And, 2018 is an election year that is expected to see a President Trump trickle down effect.

Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, and Mitch Kokai, of the John Locke Foundation, discuss those stories during this conversation.

Fans of the Carolina Panthers will watch their team in the Wildcard round of the NFL playoffs this Sunday in New Orleans. Soon those fans will wait to see what happens with the franchise.

Former North Carolina State Representative Daniel McComas (R-New Hanover) has resigned from the state Board of Transportation, one week after a former lobbyist accused him of harassment.

On this week's review of North Carolina politics, a review of the year in North Carolina politics. There were bitter partisan squabbles between the legislature and Governor Roy Cooper; economic developments; and a conclusion (sort of) to House Bill 2.

On the latest episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, Gary Robertson sits down to discuss a tumultuous year in North Carolina politics.

The Associated Press statehouse reporter shares details from recent conversations with Governor Roy Cooper and Senate Leader Phil Berger, weighs in on "the story of the year," and shares his favorite Christmas song.

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation with Gerry Cohen, who first ventured into the North Carolina General Assembly more than 45 years ago while working on his graduate thesis.

WUNC and the NC Insider published two stories this week about the culture of harassment at the North Carolina General Assembly.

North Carolina's largest managed care health organization came under further fire this week when it was taken over by a state agency.

This week in North Carolina politics, a conversation about judicial redistricting and Anita Earls’ race for state Supreme Court; the special master's legislative maps; and objections from North Carolina Senators Tillis and Burr against Donald Trump’s EPA nominee.

Democrats received a boost this week, as a wave of candidates celebrated victory in the first round of elections during the Trump Presidency.

Historically the party not in the White House fares well at the ballot box in the first couple years of a new administration. Brent Woodcox, special council to Republicans at the legislature, joins the podcast to talk election results, his concerns over Donald Trump, and local craft beer.

Democrats had their best night in a while on Tuesday, as an anti-Trump message helped the party pick-up two governorship, and end super-majorities in Virginia and Georgia.

Democrat David Price has seen plenty during his 30 years in the U.S. House, from the impeachment of President Bill Clinton to the chaos of a Trump Administration.

This week in state politics, another development in the redistricting saga, and a congressional hearing on social media.

This week in North Carolina politics, a discussion on the latest state redistricting developments, a state lawmaker who is officially changing parties from Republican to Democrat, and a look at whether any leaders can bring people back to the middle.

Jonathan Kappler got hooked on North Carolina politics during high school when he served in the House as a page. Today he's the Executive Director of the NC Free Enterprise Foundation.

This week in North Carolina politics, state lawmakers voted to override another executive veto. Hours later, they introduced a proposal to amend the North Carolina Constitution. And changes to the judiciary are key to both plans that garnered attention at the General Assembly this week.

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