Jason deBruyn

Jason deBruyn is the WUNC data reporter, a position he took in September, 2016.

In the role, Jason investigates story lines hidden in data to uncover untold issues that matter to North Carolinians. He passionate about giving a voice to the voiceless and using data to shine a light on disenfranchised groups have been taken advantage of.

Prior to joining WUNC, Jason covered the business of health care and pharmaceuticals for Triangle Business Journal in Raleigh, an affiliate of the American City Business Journals network. His reporting roots trace to the Enquirer-Journal, a community newspaper in Monroe, North Carolina.

House Bill 2 apparently did not dampen tourism in 2016.

North Carolina recorded a record $22.9 billion in visitor spending last year, according to figures recently put out by the Department of Commerce.

That’s an increase of 4.3 percent from 2015 and supported more than 218,000 tourism jobs, according to commerce.

Updated at 12:53 p.m., June 21, 2017

North Carolina state senators are expected to give final approval to a $23 billion dollar state budget Wednesday afternoon.

A fourth veto, and now a fourth override, and now hog farmers are shielded with government protection.

Governor Roy Cooper sharply criticized the federal government after it gave North Carolina less than 1 percent of the relief funds sought to assist victims of Hurricane Matthew.

Financial services giant Credit Suisse will add 1,200 new jobs in North Carolina and invest more than $70 million at its Research Triangle Park campus, the company announced Tuesday.

In many homes across the state, residents come home from work, turn on their lights, run their dishwashers and watch television or browse the Internet. They do all this without giving much thought to the electricity that courses for miles underground and through their house to power these devices.

Lawmakers recently passed a bill reducing the size of the North Carolina Court of Appeals. Republicans said the court's caseload is down, but Democrats complained the only motivation was to prevent Governor Cooper from making appointments.

So who’s right?

Flooding. Sewer spills. Contaminated drinking water.

Across North Carolina's communities, water systems have been pushed to their limits, and in some cases overrun. Hurricane Matthew, for example, wreaked havoc. On a smaller scale, flooding throughout the Triangle this week showed that drainage systems are susceptible even outside major disasters.

The king of beers is, well, still the king of beers. But the hundreds of small breweries, including many in North Carolina, are quickly gaining steam.

Over the past few years, teachers across North Carolina received highly publicized pay raises.

The increases were generally met with few objections and heralded as long overdue.

Left out of the press releases, however, was a shift that reduced teaching assistant positions, something that will hurt disadvantaged students across the state.


Workplace fatalities in North Carolina hit a six-year high, according to preliminary data released by the N.C. Department of Labor.

North Carolina's abortion rate has inched up since 2011, even as the national rate continues a long and steady decline, according to new figures released by the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports legalized abortion.

North Carolina's public universities will likely increase tuition and fees for new students.

Even after a 2 percent tuition increase, however, North Carolina public universities would still rank among the cheapest when compared to respective peers.

Just as a new Republican-led Congress on Capitol Hill is discussing how to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, North Carolina's newly elected governor pledged to implement portions of the ACA that had been left behind in this state.

This is the first of three stories in a series looking into North Carolina's opioid drug epidemic.

On many days, Louise Vincent still cries.

She thinks about what might have been. Maybe her daughter, Selena, could have been a mother herself. Maybe a teacher. Maybe a social worker.

This is the second of three stories in a series looking into North Carolina's opioid drug epidemic. Read the first story here.

Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram was losing a battle against drugs.

This is the final of three stories in a series looking into North Carolina's opioid drug epidemic. Read the first and second stories.

Louise Vincent believes her daughter, Selena, would still be alive today if a harm reduction treatment method were more widely accepted.

The newly renamed North Carolina F.C. will face stiff competition to join Major League Soccer.

Owner Steve Malik bought the team a little more than a year ago, when it was still named the Carolina RailHawks. He quickly set his sights on making a bid to move from the North American Soccer League, a minor league soccer league, to the MLS, the highest professional soccer level in the United States.

Fake news has received significant attention in the wake of the 2016 election. But to many in the news industry, it’s the continuing demise of real news organizations that raises bigger warning flags.

Big changes hit the Triangle’s soccer world Tuesday as the owner of the local professional team proposed plans to push for a Major League Soccer bid, form a women’s professional team and seek a new stadium with a capacity of more than 20,000 seats.

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