Frank Stasio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

  The Durham Police Department has been accused of racial profiling, which led the Human Relations Commission to recommend changes in policy and procedure in May.

When you were a child, did you imagine being Superman? 

 People rarely associate gay and lesbian films with the science fiction genre. But a Durham-based production company, KVWorks, created a sci-fi lesbian web series. 

  

Stand-up comedy acts can be a routine collection of one-liner and insults. 

  

North Carolina has a drug overdose rate that is higher than average. 

The Levine Museum of the New South recently unveiled a historic exhibit that spotlights the LGBTQ community of Charlotte. 

The Expansion Of Video Games

Aug 8, 2014

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show that aired June 4, 2014.

When many people hear the words “video game,” they think of a stereotypical geeky teenage boy. But that image does not represent the true industry.

Meet Monika Johnson-Hostler

Aug 4, 2014

Note: Today's program is a rebroadcast of a program originally aired on July 14, 2014.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Monika Johnston-Hostler, Executive Director of the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Wake County School Board Member.

    

Lisa Fischer is one of the most in-demand vocalists in the music industry, but she rarely takes center stage.

  The late 19th century American South was marked by inequality; Jim Crow was the law of the land and racial segregation was both a social norm and a legal requirement.

    

When Beth McKenzie's grandmother passed away, she left behind a hefty nursing home bill and a dilapidated mansion, and it was up to Beth to figure out what to do. But luckily, she had a plan. 

  

After a bad end to a long-term relationship, animal behavior expert Jennifer Verdolin decided to look to the animal kingdom for new insight on dating. 

    

Rev. Jasmine Beach-Ferrara is an ordained minister and published author who uses her faith work and fiction writing to create new strategies for supporting LGBT communities in the South. 

Donating A Family

Jul 17, 2014


When filmmaker Rick Dillwood agreed to donate sperm to his neighbors, he hardly knew them. Mel and Carey Downey-Piper had been seeking a known donor but not a good friend. However, after many months of celebration and hardship, the three became very close. Dillwood recorded their journey in a documentary called "Between Friends & Family".

 
 

Kid Finance

Jul 17, 2014

Children learn a great deal about money from their parents. But which aspects are parents wont to teach and which do they often conceal? Researcher Lynsey Romo sought to answer that in her new study, "Money Matters: Children's Perceptions of Parent-Child Financial Disclosure".

Meanwhile, an exhibit at Marbles Kids Museum aims to facilitate money talk in kids as young as five and the North Carolina Bankers Association works with middle and high school students.

    

Reynolds American and Lorillard, two of the country’s biggest tobacco producers, announced a merger yesterday that is expected to reshape the tobacco industry. 

Audio Under the Stars

Jul 16, 2014

  

Live storytelling events have increased in popularity recently, but audio listening parties are still relatively rare. A monthly event called "Audio Under the Stars" seeks to change that in Durham.

Its organizers see audio stories as vehicles to other times and occasions for social engagement. The latest installment, "Fish Out Of Water: Stories of misfits, oddballs, mariners and real fish", is Friday at 8pm at SPECTRE Arts in Durham.

Below is a taste of the kind of stories "Audio Under the Stars" showcases. 


Host Frank Stasio talks with Monika Johnston-Hostler, Executive Director of the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Wake County School Board Member. 

How The World Cup Moves Stock Prices

Jul 11, 2014

    

As the 2014 World Cup draws to a close, all eyes are on Brazil. Historical data shows the effects of this tournament may go far beyond the walls of the stadium.

Dirty Business

Jul 10, 2014

Former stockbroker Bernie Madoff and former New York Times journalist Jayson Blair share infamy for their unethical business decisions.

A new report considers the psychology behind these transgressions and shows that misdeeds tend to escalate into larger scandals over time.

Life's difficult choices rarely present themselves in one dramatic question or one big decision. Instead, our most important choices in life, including ethical ones, present themselves in small baby steps.

-Jayson Blair  

    

The Appalachian Mountains of Western North Carolina are the center of a rich history of music and dance, from musicians like Doc Watson and Earl Scruggs, to traditions like ballad singing and square dancing. 

Sofia, Melanie, Amanda and August von Trapp are the grandchildren of Werner von Trapp. He was portrayed as Kurt in the beloved film, "The Sound of Music." The young von Trapps learned to sing from their grandfather and have been touring together for 13 years. The foursome sang "Edelweiss" on The State of Things.

  

In his debut novel, Chapel-Hill based author Michael B. Jones explores a tumultuous relationship between a father and son who search for happiness and identity as their lives fall apart around them.

Seeds play a prominent role in global agriculture and food supply systems. 

Meet Alexandra Zagbayou

Jul 7, 2014

Alexandra Zagbayou was born in Montreal but returned to her father's homeland of Ivory Coast when she was 4 years old. Six years later, her family fled because they feared political persecution in the tense years before the country's civil war.

"We thought we would be in the U.S. for a summer. The summer turned into 15 years," she said.

The family moved to Raleigh, North Carolina, where Zagbayou learned English by reverse engineering her school's French classes.

Later, her parents returned to Africa while she and her sister stayed in Raleigh with their aunt and uncle. A few years after that, their uncle was killed.

Zagbayou's older sister became her primary guardian while she worked hard to finish high school and secure funding for college. 

One summer, Zagbayou taught dance classes to homeless and displaced youth. This was when she first began to process her own challenging life experiences. She realized not only that she related to her students, but that she had come out the other side. 

Today she helps run the Durham-based college-access organization, Student U. The program empowers students to pursue their own educational journeys despite diverse challenges. 

Letters To The Unborn

Jul 2, 2014

After a whirlwind reunion with a childhood friend, Addie Lockwood finds herself unexpectedly pregnant. Never aspiring to motherhood, she chooses adoption without telling the father. But even before the child is born, Addie feels compelled to write letters to him.

The story is the premise of Byrd (Dzanc Books/2014), a new book by Raleigh-based author Kim Church.

A project at the Museum of Natural Sciences pulls samples of face mites from subjects’ faces which can be examined under a microscope.

The Art of Drag

Jul 1, 2014

    

Author Jeff VanderMeer dreamed he was walking down a tunnel where words were appearing on the wall.

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