Cass Herrington

Morning Edition Host, Reporter

Cass Herrington is BPR's Morning Edition host and news reporter. Her reporting largely focuses on stories dealing with health, race, and immigration. 

Before joining BPR in 2019, Herrington spent nearly seven years writing, reporting and hosting for NPR stations in Illinois and Indiana. 

Her reporting has earned numerous awards, including the designations of best reporter by the Associated Press Broadcaster’s Associations in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky.

In 2015, Cass received a prestigious national Edward R. Murrow award for a show she produced about non-verbal teens with Autism who rely on iPads to communicate.

A Kentucky native, Herrington graduated from the University of Kentucky with a degree in journalism, international studies and Spanish. She's fluent in Spanish, loves to travel, and is a proud, bleed-blue Kentucky Wildcats fan. 

Herrington also co-hosts a podcast, called Skillet, about the intersection of food and memory.

Cass Herrington / BPR News

Asheville is taking steps to better preserve and highlight its African American history.  

Cass Herrington / BPR News

Asheville City Council delayed action on approving a redevelopment proposal for a section of the Asheville Mall that includes the now defunct Sears building. The $45 million dollar project would include retail space, a movie theater and more than 200 units of housing.

Critics of the project say it lacks the streetscape and infrastructure needs of the area, as well as for the anticipated addition of new residents.

City of Asheville

Asheville has a new city attorney on its payroll. City Council has unanimously approved the appointment of Brad R. Branham to the post Tue. 

He’s currently the assistant city attorney for the city of Charlotte.

City Council announced the decision yesterday following a special meeting.  The city says in a news release Branham isn't necessarily a newcomer to Asheville -- he went to UNC Asheville for undergrad. 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Creative Commons

 

 

Western North Carolina’s two most populous counties have differing policies when it comes to working with federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Cass Herrington / BPR News

  

Last month, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers arrested nearly 300 people across North Carolina. Those arrests are still sending shockwaves throughout Western North Carolina’s Latinx community.