The Vaccine Rollout Will Take Time. Here's What The U.S. Can Do Now To Save Lives

While the country's attention is fixed on the rollout of the vaccine and the arrival of a new administration, the coronavirus pandemic rages on. In many parts of the U.S., case counts and deaths are still sky-high. And new variants of the virus are worrying scientists and prompting new restrictions around the globe. Despite widespread COVID-19 fatigue, public health experts say practicing mitigation strategies is as crucial as ever to save lives. But which strategies have proven most...

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Matt Bush / Blue Ridge Public Radio

WNC COVID-19 Updates: Week Of Jan. 18

Updated at 4:00 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of Russians took to the streets in protest on Saturday to demand the release of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny, braving the threat of mass arrests in what was expected to be one of the largest demonstrations against the Kremlin in years.

With his trademark suspenders and deep baritone voice Larry King spoke with presidents, world leaders, celebrities, authors, scientists, comedians, athletes — everyone. The Peabody Award-winning broadcaster died Saturday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 87.

The death of the famed interviewer was announced on King's Twitter feed in a posting from his production studio, Ora Media. No cause of death was provided, but King had recently been hospitalized with COVID-19.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Larry King has died. He was 87. And in a career that spanned 60 years, Larry King interviewed just about everybody. Reporter Jeff Lunden has this appreciation.

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: With his trademark suspenders and his deep baritone voice tinged with a Brooklyn accent, Larry King spoke with presidents...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

LARRY KING: George Bush is our honored guest for the full hour - next on "Larry King Live."

LUNDEN: ...World leaders...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Larry King has died. He was 87. And in a career that spanned 60 years, Larry King interviewed just about everybody. Reporter Jeff Lunden has this appreciation.

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: With his trademark suspenders and his deep baritone voice tinged with a Brooklyn accent, Larry King spoke with presidents...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

LARRY KING: George Bush is our honored guest for the full hour - next on "Larry King Live."

LUNDEN: ...World leaders...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

A year ago, who would have thought 78-year-old Joe Biden would be sworn in this week as president?

He had just finished fourth in the Iowa caucuses. He would soon finish fifth in the New Hampshire primary. He was derided as old, out-of-touch, an elderly, silvery centrist who said screwball things, as when he told a crowd, "Folks, I can tell you I've known eight presidents, three of them intimately."

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Larry King has died. He was 87. And in a career that spanned 60 years, Larry King interviewed just about everybody. Reporter Jeff Lunden has this appreciation.

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: With his trademark suspenders and his deep baritone voice tinged with a Brooklyn accent, Larry King spoke with presidents...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

LARRY KING: George Bush is our honored guest for the full hour - next on "Larry King Live."

LUNDEN: ...World leaders...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Larry King has died. He was 87. And in a career that spanned 60 years, Larry King interviewed just about everybody. Reporter Jeff Lunden has this appreciation.

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: With his trademark suspenders and his deep baritone voice tinged with a Brooklyn accent, Larry King spoke with presidents...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

LARRY KING: George Bush is our honored guest for the full hour - next on "Larry King Live."

LUNDEN: ...World leaders...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LARRY KING LIVE")

The Americans with Disabilities Act says schools have to help not just students but parents with disabilities, too, like making sure deaf or blind parents can communicate during parent-teacher conferences. But what happens when kids are learning at home? That's uncharted territory.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Arts & Performance

courtesy Caleb Beissert

Last March, when the public still grasped the reality of a pandemic, Katie Jones looked at the calendar and thought the Asheville Fringe Festival, which she directs, might have to do things differently in 2021.

“Our initial thoughts were actually that we might just cancel altogether,” Jones said.

Matt Peiken | BPR News

While coming of age in London, Farhad Kanuga felt pulled in two directions: Taking part in the political and social protests pervading the city and documenting those protests with his camera.

“I felt I was a photographer as well as being part of the demonstration, which as I grew older, I learned it goes one or the other—don’t go as both,” he said. “Just missing moments when you’re cheering or what have you, doing something other than keeping your eye on what’s going on, being ready for that click.”

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BPR En Español

Resúmenes para la semana del 9 de noviembre

Nov 13, 2020

COVID y Seguro Médico
Más de 250.000 habitantes de Carolina del Norte han perdido su seguro de salud durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Así lo anuncia un estudio publicado recientemente en el periódico de medicina de Carolina del Norte. El autor, Mark Holmes, de la Escuela de Salud Pública de la universidad UNC Gillings School, confirmó que dicha cifra corresponde a un aumento del 3% comparado con el promedio de otros años. El estudio también confirmó un aumento de 7% de habitantes de Carolina del Norte que se han afiliado al sistema público Medicaid. 

Resúmenes para la semana del 26 de octubre

Oct 31, 2020
Illustration by Luis Martinez

 

Actualización COVID-19  

El Departamento de Salud Pública de Carolina del Norte ha confirmado 1.600 nuevos casos de COVID-19 el pasado lunes, una cifra menor al domingo anterior con 1.700 casos. El viernes de la semana pasada se registró un récord con 2.700 casos.
Hasta el momento se han confirmado 261.000 casos de personas contagiadas con coronavirus desde que comenzó la pandemia. Cerca de 11.000 personas han sido confirmadas con COVID-19 en el área donde se escucha la transmisión de BPR. 

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