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New Connections Between Ozone And Cardiovascular Health

Photo of smog from apartment in Shanghai, China.
Leniners
/
Flickr - Creative Commons
Photo of smog from apartment in Shanghai, China.

Burning fossil fuels through cars and coal plants is exacerbating the presence of ground-level ozone gas in the air we breathe. The gas has been linked to negative effects on pulmonary health, but a new study from Duke University shows ozone may have serious consequences for heart health as well. 

A conversation with Drew Day, research associate with the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University and the Duke Global Health Institute, about a new study suggesting ground ozone levels may have serious consequences for heart health.

In a cooperative effort between Duke and Duke Kunshan University, researchers found higher exposure to ground-level ozone led to higher blood pressure and blood platelet activation – risk factors for cardiovascular health.

Host Frank Stasio speaks with Drew Day, research associate with the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University and the Duke Global Health Institute, about the new study. 

Copyright 2017 North Carolina Public Radio

Laura Pellicer is a producer with The State of Things (hyperlink), a show that explores North Carolina through conversation. Laura was born and raised in Montreal, Quebec, a city she considers arrestingly beautiful, if not a little dysfunctional. She worked as a researcher for CBC Montreal and also contributed to their programming as an investigative journalist, social media reporter, and special projects planner. Her work has been nominated for two Canadian RTDNA Awards. Laura loves looking into how cities work, pursuing stories about indigenous rights, and finding fresh voices to share with listeners. Laura is enamored with her new home in North Carolina—notably the lush forests, and the waves where she plans on moonlighting as a mediocre surfer.
Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.