global warming

Winter is coming, later and later. And then spring comes ever earlier.

Analyzing freeze dates from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows that the days between the first freeze of fall and the last freeze of spring are shrinking.

unfccc.int

Nearly 200 countries are wrapping up the annual United Nations Climate Summit in Bonn, Germany this week. Notably absent is the United States. This summer, President Trump declared he is pulling the U.S. out of the landmark Paris Climate Accord, which aims to reduce carbon emissions and holds countries accountable for limiting the rise in global temperatures.   But the move hasn’t stopped hundreds of climate scientists and researchers from participating, including Western Carolina University’s Rob Young, a geologist who directs The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines.  Young spoke with BPR’s Helen Chickering shortly after he returned from Bonn.

NPR/AP/NOAA

Recent hurricanes Irma and Harvey were a stark reminder of the catastrophic impacts of climate change.   But the words “climate change” have become so politically polarizing that some even avoid saying them.  In Asheville, that’s not the case. 

A report on sea level rise in North Carolina points to dozens of coastal communities that face chronic flooding over the next century. 

At least two wind farm developers say they will likely suspend their projects in North Carolina if a proposed moratorium goes into effect. 

Global warming and urbanization are threatening bee populations across the country. One factor in that threat is heat. At high temperatures, bees become unable to reproduce, fly or even walk.

So researchers from North Carolina State University recently set out to see just how much heat local wild bees could handle.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Add North Carolina’s Attorney General to the list of those disappointed with President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Accord.  During a visit to downtown Asheville Tuesday, Josh Stein expressed his disappointment with the decision, saying it puts the nation’s economic future in peril.

A trade association representing energy organizations in the Carolinas say President Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris Accord will have little immediate effect on local energy companies.

BBC

Reaction to President Donald Trump's decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Climate Accord is drawing swift reaction.  Andrew Jones is co-director of Climate Interactive, housed at The Collider in downtown Asheville.  He spoke with BPR shortly after the election to express optimism, despite then President-elect Trump's skepticism of climate science.  Now, Jones says he's outraged and more determined than ever to do all he can to slow the climate's warming.  He spoke Friday with BPR's Jeremy Loeb.

North Carolina's inland cities could have an unforeseen influx of residents from the coast due to sea level rise. 

Cape Lookout Lighthouse Switches To Solar

May 9, 2017

The Cape Lookout Lighthouse on the Crystal Coast will switch to a solar-powered system this week.

In many homes across the state, residents come home from work, turn on their lights, run their dishwashers and watch television or browse the Internet. They do all this without giving much thought to the electricity that courses for miles underground and through their house to power these devices.

The North Carolina Department of Revenue gave a record number of tax credits last year for renewable energy use.

David Liu

Andrew Jones is co-director of Climate Interactive, a non-profit international group with employees housed in Asheville's Collider climate change innovation center.    He stopped by WCQS a few weeks after the election of Donald Trump to speak with Jeremy Loeb about the group's work and what he called his hopeful outlook as many in the industry are concerned about having a so-called "climate denier" in the White House.  

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

Environmental groups are worried about what a Trump presidency means for our changing climate.  But for the climate change innovation center The Collider, its effort to foster private sector climate change solutions could take on greater significance if the government falls behind.  Donald Trump has promised to relax environmental rules, pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord, and called climate change a "hoax" perpetrated by China.  

Duke Energy has reached an agreement with developers of large solar farms that could limit where they build in North Carolina.  But officials say new procedures won't slow the growth of solar here.

North Carolina solar projects are big winners in the U.S. Department of Agriculture loan guarantees for renewable energy projects. In all, the USDA today awarded $43 million worth of loan guarantees to projects scattered across the country. But North Carolina was the big winner, as seven projects here pulled in more than half the total.

  A bill that would have banned wind farms across much of North Carolina died when the state legislature adjourned last week, but several lawmakers said Thursday they'll reintroduce it next year.  

Summer has brought moderate-to-severe drought conditions to 14 counties in the southwest corner of the state.

The area usually sees about an inch of rain per week, but not so this year, according to State Climatologist Rebecca Ward.

The North Carolina Senate approved a bill Monday that would ban wind farms across much of the state. The "Military Operations Protection Act," which passed 33-14, would not allow wind turbines in areas with military training flights.

Lawmakers in the state Senate have passed a bill that would prohibit wind farms from being built in most of central and eastern North Carolina. Bill sponsor Sen. Harry Brown (R-Onslow) says the measure protects airspace the state's military bases use in training exercises.

DUNCAN McFADYEN: North Carolina's Division of Motor Vehicles ruled last week that Tesla can't sell its electric cars at a store in Charlotte. That has a lot of people scratching their heads - why not? WFAE's David Boraks is with me now to talk about it.

Ashley Rodgers via Time.com

Katharine Hayhoe, a renowned climate scientist and evangelical Christian, will bring her call to action on climate change to Asheville.  Hayhoe has events scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday (4/5 and 4/6).  The trip is sponsored by environmental group MountainTrue (who underwrites on WCQS) and the Creation Care Alliance of WNC.  Hayhoe is director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University.  She was featured on a Showtime documentary and was on Time magazine's 2014 list of Top 100 most influential people in the world.

NOAA's 2015 Climate Report Part of Alarming Trend

Jan 25, 2016
NOAA

2015 was the hottest year in recorded history, according to a report released jointly by NOAA and NASA last week.  The numbers were expected following months of record-breaking heat.  Much of that research and data is compiled at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information based in Asheville.  For more, WCQS's Jeremy Loeb spoke with Deke Arndt, NOAA's Chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at NCEI.  

NOAA

New data from NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information based in Asheville finds December set records for the hottest and wettest month across the contiguous U.S.  The record month also boosted 2015 to the 2nd warmest year recorded for the contiguous U.S.  Only 2012 was warmer.  10 extreme weather events across the U.S.

NOAA

2015 now expected to break the record for warmest year ever recorded.

NOAA: September 2015 Hottest Ever Recorded

Oct 27, 2015
NOAA

A new report from NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information based in Asheville finds September of 2015 was the hottest September ever recorded.  Thomas Karl, the center's director, says the earth continues to warm and the evidence overwhelmingly points to human beings as the cause, and specifically the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. 

Records have been kept since 1880.  From NOAA's press release:

Report: 2014 is the Hottest Year on Record

Jan 20, 2015
ncdc.noaa.gov

A report released last week by NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville finds 2014 was the hottest year on record.  That’s based on temperatures measured since the year 1880.   And it’s part of a trend of warming temperatures around the globe.  Asheville resident and climate scientist Jessica Blunden led and coordinated the report.  She says there’s no question what’s causing the warming.