Photo courtesy of Western Carolina University

Western Carolina Trustees Approve Increased Fees For Students In 2019

This week, Western Carolina University Board of Trustees approved increased fees and rates for the 2019-20 academic year. Overall, mandatory fees paid by students will increase by $48 dollars per year or 1.7 percent. This includes an $8 increase in the health services feel, $14 increase in the student activity fee and a $26 per year increase in the university’s athletics fee as well as other increases. At a committee meeting before the Trustee’s meeting, Randy Eaton, athletics director,...

Read More

The State of Things

“The State of Things” covers diverse issues & topics in NC. Frank Stasio talks to authors, musicians, politicians, & citizens about subjects that matter to North Carolinians.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May is fighting to keep her job as members of her Conservative Party seek to oust her in a no-confidence vote. May has been unable to shore up support for the Brexit deal she negotiated with the European Union.

"I will contest that vote with everything I've got," May said outside of 10 Downing Street, referring to the vote on her leadership that will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. local time (1 p.m. - 3 p.m. ET).

Almost 300,000 North Carolinians without health insurance could get a plan with no monthly premiums on the federal marketplace. That’s according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis. 

As the U.S. government investigates the breach of Marriott's Starwood chain hotel reservation system, it appears Chinese state hackers are mostly likely responsible for the data breach. The information of about 500 million customers worldwide was exposed.

Code Switch's 2018 Book Guide

24 minutes ago

Seasons greetings! Or should we say ... seasons readings? This week, we're sharing our favorite recent reads. Karen Grigsby Bates, our resident book expert, estimates that she's read about 150 books this year. Of those, she recommends Washington Black, a novel by Esi Edugyan about an enslaved boy who works on a plantation in Barbados.

Two students share a laptop in the atrium of the chemistry building at the University of Michigan. One, Cameron Russell, is white, a freshman from a rice-growing parish in Louisiana; the other, Elijah Taylor, is black, a senior and a native of Detroit.

They are different, yes, but there is much that unites them.

The video footage is surreal, a pair of gloved spacesuit hands wielding what looks like a silver dagger, poised to stab the outside of a Russian spacecraft.

"Honestly I can't look at that," cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev says, as voiced by a translator, while fellow cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko slices into the side of the Soyuz MS-09 capsule. "It's my vehicle, Oleg!"

It was all part of an attempt Tuesday to solve the mystery of the leaking International Space Station.

The recent shooting deaths of two black men by police have reignited protests about police use of force. In both incidents, the men had guns and police wrongly mistook them for suspects.

Dr. Jonathan Sevransky was intrigued when he heard that a well-known physician in Virginia had reported remarkable results from a simple treatment for sepsis. Could the leading cause of death in hospitals really be treated with intravenous vitamin C, the vitamin thiamine and doses of steroids?

Tim Green first noticed the symptoms about five years ago.

The former NFL player, whose strength was a job requirement, suddenly found his hands weren't strong enough to use a nail clipper. His words didn't come out as fast as he was thinking them.

"I'm a strange guy," Tim says. "I get something in my head and I can just run with it. I was really afraid I had ALS. But there was enough doubt that I said 'alright, I don't. Let's not talk about it. Let's not do anything.'"

Denying pain and injury had been a survival strategy in football.

Pages

Arts & Performance

Matt Peiken | BPR News


At first listen to his new album, it would be easy to cast Marley Carroll as a musician whose instruments are a computer and software.

“Once I started really getting into computer-based production, that was the thing that showed me it was possible to produce full records on my own,” he said. “Basically opening up this program and hooking up a MIDI keyboard and hearing a Rhodes sound or a Strat or drum set, it just seemed like the whole universe of musical possibilities was suddenly available to me.”

Courtesy of Aaron Snook


Aaron Snook has devoted his professional life to creating theater off the beaten path.

“I started envisioning a theater that was different, that was more inclusive, and more community building,” he said. “The mission itself is to create new American myths.”

Matt Peiken | BPR News


Monica McDaniel didn’t grow up with theater and hasn’t seen much theater as an adult. So even she can’t quite answer why she thought about writing her first play.

“I was sitting at a family member’s house, watching TV and I was like “What would you think if I did a play?’ And she was like ‘OK?” And I just went home and wrote a play,” McDaniel recalled. “I feel like God gives me something and I go with it.”


Listen to the Asheville band Town Mountain, and you hear mandolin, banjo, the twang in the harmonies—all the markers of bluegrass.

But listen a little more closely. There are socially conscious lyrics and, on the new album—gasp—a drummer. From early on, band members say Town Mountain never quite fit within the bounds of traditional bluegrass.